Charlottesville Breaking News

Mac McDonald resigns as 'Voice of the Cavs'

After more than a decade at the mic at UVA football and men's basketball games, Mac McDonald announced yesterday that he is resigning his post with the Virginia Sports Network as the Cavaliers' radio play-by-play man. "I now have an opportunity on a couple fronts to move forward in my career and After more than a decade at the mic at UVA football and men's basketball games, Mac McDonald announced yesterday that he is resigning his post with the Virginia Sports Network as the Cavaliers' radio play-by-play man.

"I now have an opportunity on a couple fronts to move forward in my career and pursue a couple goals that I have had for some time," he says in a press release. "I will always treasure my time with the players, coaches and administration."

This marks the second time McDonald has said goodbye to Charlottesville. The fir...

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Jill Summers, 74, Faulkner's only child

The only child of William Faulkner, Jill Faulkner Summers, has died at the age of 74, 17 months after suffering a debilitating stroke. An avid fox hunter, Summers was, until the time of her illness, the Master of Foxhounds for the Farmington Hunt, a role she described in a 2005 story in the Hook. Married to a professional money manager, Paul Summers, Summers was the mother of three children, daughter Cathy as well as Bok and Paul Jr., who for many years operated the former Blue Ridge Brewing Company, Charlottesville's first restaurant/brew pub, on West Main Street. The Daily Progress has an obituary.

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Kennedy's not-so-happy Charlottesville anniversary

Although his aptitude for campaigning and policy has since guided him to a long, storied career in Democratic party politics, Edward Kennedy didn't always display such great judgment. Three years before he outran his Republican opponent to become a U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, he tried to outrun Albemarle County cops as a 26-year-old UVA law student.

Fifty years ago this month, on the night of March 14, 1958, Deputy Sheriff Thomas "Mac" Whitten spotted Kennedy running a red light in an Oldsmobile convertible. When Whitten gave chase, Kennedy allegedly doused his headlights to avoid detection, but Whitten caught up with the brother of then-Senator John F. Kennedy and issued him a ticket for reckless driving, racing with an officer to avoid arrest, and operating a motor vehicle without an operator's license.

A week later, Whitten was sitting at the same intersection when he spotted Kennedy driving the same Oldsmobile.

"He did exactly the same thing as before," recalled Whitten in Leo Damore's 1988 book, Senatorial Privilege. "He raced through t...

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Hook brings home bacon (16 awards)

Some of the stories that touched the hearts and minds of Charlottesville last year, including the Hook's expose on a police department collision that provoked community outrage helped this paper earn six First Place awards last night from the Virginia Press Association.

The awards, presented at a banquet in the Hotel Roanoke, also included ten second and third place awards for the Hook, 16 awards in all–- plus mention as the finalist in the Association's top prize, the Award for Journalistic Integrity and Community Service, an honor the Hook shared last year with the Richmond Times-Dispatch. It was Courteney Stuart's stories on Charlottesville and Albemarle police departments' treatment of Gerry Mitchell, the wheelchair-bound pedestrian plowed into in a crosswalk and then issued a ticket while recovering from his injuries in a local hospital, that took first place in government/public safety reporting. Stuart also took first for her two-part feature series looking back 25 years after the murders of Katie Worsky and ...

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Closing in? Foul play now cited in Abshire death

 


Grief over the death of their daughter is compounded by the pain of not knowing how she died, says Steve Swartz, seen here dancing with Justine at her wedding on May 28, 2006– five months before her death.
PHOTO COURTESY SWARTZ FAMILY

Sixteen months after Justine Swartz Abshire was found dead on a dark and winding country road in Orange County, the apparent victim of a hit and run, newly released state police information seems to support her parents' long-held belief that her death was no accident.

 

Although Justine, a 27-year-old kindergarten teacher, had reportedly called her husband to pick her up after her car broke down that night, police now say two independent mechanics found nothing wrong with her 2002 Ford Mustang, which started up at the scene of the accident. Even more significant, however: Justine may not have been hit by a car.

While police haven't yet released the full autopsy report, Special Agent Mike Jones of the Virginia State Police now reveals, in contrast to earlier reports that called her death merely mysterious, that Justine was quite possibly a victim of foul play.

Jones says Justine sustained "massive amounts" of blunt trauma sometime before her death and that he doesn't believe she was hit by a car–...

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