Charlottesville Breaking News

State wonders: Where's John Kluge (and his wallet)?

When the new Virginia Civil Rights Memorial is unveiled in Richmond's Capitol Square July 21, Rita Moseley, 61, will be there with her new college degree. Moseley's degree in business administration comes courtesy of the Brown v. Board of Education scholarship program started in 2004. When the new Virginia Civil Rights Memorial is unveiled in Richmond's Capitol Square July 21, Rita Moseley, 61, will be there with her new college degree.

Moseley's degree in business administration comes courtesy of the Brown v. Board of Education scholarship program started in 2004. The idea is to pay tuitions for black students whose local schools in Prince Edward and Warren counties, as well as the cities of Norfolk and even Charlottesville, were closed in the name of Massive Resistance after the landmark 1954 ruling. In the case of Prince Edward, the closing lasted five years, effectively terminating the educational careers of some students who are now grown and in some cases retired.

The scholarship fund, however, still has some unfinished business. In 2004, fo...

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So you wanna bust your neighbor...

So, it's been 30 minutes, and the dog next door still won't quit yapping. What now?

First, under the new Albemarle anti-barking law, you need to determine whether or not your neighbor's property is five acres or larger. If not, you can proceed under the newly-approved barking ordinance.

Start by ignoring the address on Albemarle County's website; the Charlottesville-Albemarle Magistrate's office hasn't been downtown for at least five years.

Now located at 1610 Avon Street, it's next to the local jail. And although it's supposedly open 24 hours a day, on the morning of our visit, June 16, we had to wait while something urgent was rushed to a courthouse downtown.

"Take a number," jokes a man in front of me when the office finally reopens 40 minutes after my arrival.

Six chairs are lined up in a formation reminiscent of a passport line in a post office. I take a seat.

Another thirty minutes go by, and a magistrate invites me in. I am in a room with a table and chair, and there is a sheet of thick glass se...

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Arts attack: 2nd St. director abruptly resigns

Is there something in the nonprofit water that has directors of local cultural institutions dropping like cherry blossoms to pursue the ubiquitous "other opportunities"? Long-time Second Street Gallery executive director Leah Stoddard becomes the latest to mysteriously disappear, turning in a resignation May 5–- without the usual two weeks or more notice that typically accompanies cordial departures. By May 6, she was no longer listed on the gallery website.

"I have resigned," Stoddard confirms from home May 7. As for the lack of notice, "I can't really talk about it," she says.

Stoddard joins the Paramount Theater's former director Edward Rucker, who tendered his resignation May 2 "to pursue other opportunities" after a 10-month tenure and University of Virginia Art Museum director Jill Hartz, who was shown the door in December and then landed a job heading the University of Oregon's much larger museum. (Not to mention cultural icon ...

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Keno, Lynch dredge up divergent views

So what happened last night at the big dredging confab called by Charlottesville Mayor Dave Norris? Well, the two-man team from visiting engineering firm Gahagan & Bryant repeated its pitch from the previous night for how dredging could be knocked out in a matter of months, not years– certainly not 50 years, as Aaron Keno (in photo), the Gannett Fleming engineer who has been blamed for portraying dredging as an expensive, ineffective 50-year nightmare, contends.

Although he avoided mention of his own prior cost estimates, which have prompted such diverse parties as the Sierra Club, netrepreneur William Crutchfield [RTF], and Albemarle supervisor Dennis Rooker to reopen the topic, Keno got paid to reiterate his view last night, but perhaps the biggest shocker was off-topic.

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Mac McDonald resigns as 'Voice of the Cavs'

After more than a decade at the mic at UVA football and men's basketball games, Mac McDonald announced yesterday that he is resigning his post with the Virginia Sports Network as the Cavaliers' radio play-by-play man. "I now have an opportunity on a couple fronts to move forward in my career and After more than a decade at the mic at UVA football and men's basketball games, Mac McDonald announced yesterday that he is resigning his post with the Virginia Sports Network as the Cavaliers' radio play-by-play man.

"I now have an opportunity on a couple fronts to move forward in my career and pursue a couple goals that I have had for some time," he says in a press release. "I will always treasure my time with the players, coaches and administration."

This marks the second time McDonald has said goodbye to Charlottesville. The fir...

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