Charlottesville Breaking News

Neighborly complaint: Fix those hooves!

Someone in Gordonsville has dropped the reins on taking care of at least one of the horses on an estate on Lovers Lane near Route 33, and a neighbor’s complaint is not gaining much traction with local officials or the owners, despite the owners’ seemingly ample resources and the pro-horse outlook of many in rural Albemarle county.

A neighbor who wishes to remain anonymous took a photo of the pony in question, which appears to be suffering from gross hoof neglect. Hoof neglect occurs when a horse’s hooves are not trimmed and the overgrown portions alter the orientation of the feet in relation to the ground, making it painful for the horse to walk and potentially causing tendon damage.

Horses are normally taken to farriers every couple of months for trimming and shoeing. These horse specialists practice a trade dating back to the Middle Ages that has roots in blacksmithing.

Though the issue was brought to the attention of Orange County Animal Control in April by the neighbor, the pony has been continually sighted with no noticeable changes to the hooves, even as recently as last week. In communications with the complainant, Orange animal control officials have repeatedly asserted that the pony is receiving rescue care, however they did not respond the neighbor’s request for proof of this.

“That length of hoof can only be caused by lack of hoof care,” said Maya Proulx of Hope’s Legacy Equine Rescue in Afton. “To grow feet that long...

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Classroom tech: Local high schools go online

Tomorrow’s kindergarten students may live through a transition that means many of their high school classes will not include a teacher in the classroom. The technology used by today’s high school students, whether it’s in a student’s pocket or on a screen in front of them, bears little resemblance to what was available when they started their formal educations.

 

Charlottesville and Albemarle public schools are both ramping up investments in online courses, partly in...

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The Hook in review: 12 years of covering Charlottesville

The first issue of the Hook hit the streets February 7, 2002, in an America still reeling in post-9/11 shock— not quite sure how our world would change, but with an uneasy feeling that it would not be for the better.

In Charlottesville, the Downtown Mall had not yet had its Pavilion or Transit Center built on the east end. The Meadow Creek Parkway was still under debate, and the U.S. 29 Western Bypass was believed dead and buried. The old Woolen Mills dam still stood, the Jefferson Theater was a second-run movie house, and the Paramount Theater was in the throes of a lengthy restoration.

And a handful of writers, graphic designers, ad reps, and photographers followed editor Hawes Spencer to start a new weekly in a small town that already had a weekly on what would become Mr. Hook's wild ride.

2002

Charlottesville's Democratic rule was rocked with the election of Rob Schilling, the first Republican city councilor in 16 years, and the words "single-shot" voting entered the local lexicon. Environmentally, the region was parched by a drought. By September, restaurants were serving on plastic, car washes were ordered to close and reservoirs were half full, with predictions they'd be empty by December. Fortunately it rained, but this stark, water-less reality had a lot to do with the subsequent water wars of the aughts and the construction of the Ragged Mountain reservo...

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First and last days at the Hook

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The Award-winning Hook

Earlier this year, the Hook won the state's top journalism award for its coverage of the attempted ouster of UVA President Teresa Sullivan last year. It is the third time the Hook has won the coveted prize for Journalistic Integrity and Community Service, given to only two newspapers every year at the Virginia Press Association's annual award ceremony.

“Aggressive inquisitiveness beyond a daily’s or even a weekly’s normal scope produced unusual facets of the story that went uncovered by other news outlets," said the judge's statement. "This includes pursuit of angles that, while risky, opened the aperture for the audience."

In 2006, the Hook won the top prize for a package of unrelated stories, including the "12-step" rape apology case, the shooting of a pet cat, and for the coverage, penned mostly by Lisa Provence, of the so-called "school bombing plot," which a VPA judge lauded as our "shining crown jewel."

In 2008, the top award came as the result of our coverage of the controversial water proposal plan, penned mostly by former Hook editor and founder Hawes Spencer.

Since 2003, the Hook staff has won a total of 149 VPA awards. Not bad.


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