Cultural Calendar, July 29-August 12, 2004

THURSDAY, July 29

FAMILY
Let's Make a Circus:
Jeanne Wall (aka "Lulu") of BackPack Puppets presents a one-woman interactive variety show featuring juggling, magic, rope tricks, and amazing feats of balance at Scottsville Library at 10am. 330 Bird St. 286-3541. Also at Northside Library at 3pm. Albemarle Square. 973-7893.

Try it Out: Girl Scouts of Virginia invites girls ages 5-6 who are not currently enrolled in scouting to try on their Daisies program for size through a series of five sample sessions. Today's program is Games Galore. 10am-noon. $5 per session plus a one-time $10 registration fee. 380 Greenbrier Drive. 296-5156, press 4 then 3.

Peter, Jen, and Jan: Peter Jones and Jen Hoffman from "Tell Us A Tale," Charlottesville's popular children's radio show, bring their folktales to the library. The Jan Smith Band perform original and traditional songs. Free. Scottsville Library at 10am. 330 Bird St. 286-3541. Northside Library at 3pm. Albemarle Square. 973-7893.

PERFORMANCE
Swing Swap:
The Charlottesville Swing Dance Society hosts this weekly evening of swing dancing. The first hour focuses on East Coast Swing and the second hour on West Coast Swing, but the DJ takes requests. Singles and couples welcome, no partner needed. 7-9pm. Albemarle County Office Building Auditorium, 401 McIntire Road. Free. 980-2744.

Snoopy: Heritage Repertory Theater presents Charles Schulz's famous beagle– and World War I flying ace– in this musical based on the comic strip Peanuts. Fun for the whole family. 7:30pm. Helms Theatre, Culbreth Road. $14-20. 924-3376.

Annie: The Ash Lawn Opera Festival presents the world's most famous little redheaded orphan. Pine for tomorrow in the gardens of James Monroe. 8pm. Ash Lawn-Highland, off Route 795. $15-24. 293-4500.

Five Guys Named Moe: You can't help tappin' your shoes in time to this musical revue in the tradition of Ain't Misbehavin' and Smokey Joe's Cafe. Nomax is broke, his woman's walked out on him, and it's 5am&emdash; but life can't seem so bad when five jazzy guys named Moe pop out of his old radio. 8pm. Culbreth Theatre. $14-20. 924-3376.

Wonderful Summer: The Summer Theater Festival at Live Arts presents Richard Dresser's comedy Wonderful World as one of four plays in repertory. Unearth the dark truths of an apparently happy family. 9pm. Live Arts Upstage, 123 E. Water St. $8. 977-4177x100.

Exotic Dance: Get kinky at the Berkmar Ballroom with modern and jazz dance for beginners, 7-7:45pm. Sexy pole dancing for beginners, 8-9pm; for intermediates, 9-10pm. 652 Rio Road W. $15 drop-in; eight-lesson series for $80-$100. 975-4611. See Facetime.

Anton in Show Business: This Jane Martin play about three actresses and their zany production of Chekhov's Three Sisters is sure to delight. 7pm. Live Arts Upstage, 123 E. Water St. $8. 977-4177x100.

The Most Lamentable Comedy of Sir John Falstaff: Shenandoah Shakespeare presents the premier run of an original adaptation on that most gluttonous of Shakespeare's characters, culled from choice scenes in Henry IV and a bit of Henry V. 7:30pm. Blackfriars Playhouse, 10 S. Market St., Staunton. $10-28. 540-885-5588.

WALKABOUT
Earring Basics:
Studio Baboo instructor Terri Gable offers a class in making custom earrings. 5:30-7:30pm. $25 fee includes materials. 106 Fifth St. Downtown Mall. 244-2905.

African American Cultural Arts Festival: This annual event kicks off with the "Now Let Me Fly" performance and the annual "A Taste of Ghana" dinner. No fee. Burley Middle School, Rose Hill Drive. 980-3164 or cvilleafrican-amfest.com. See Walkabout feature.

TUNES
The Hamiltons at Orbit:
Though they've been playing together for only a short while, Ezra Hamilton's latest project is getting noticed– and for good reason. No cover, 10:30pm.

Junior Moment at Rapunzel's Coffee and Books. No cover, 8pm.

Jim Waive (country-folk) at the Blue Moon Diner. Free, 8pm (W)

Karaoke Night with DJ Wild Wes at Buffalo Wild Wings. Free, 9pm (W)

Travis Elliott at Orbit. No cover, 10:30pm.

Danny Beirne (piano-man) at Coupe DeVille's. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Chicken Head Blues Band at Dürty Nelly's. $4, 9pm. (W)

Fragment with Nickeltown at Gravity Lounge. $5, 8pm

Thompson/ D'earth and friends (freeform jazz) at Miller's. $4, 10pm. (W)

Octane Saints, The Elderly, and Smashcaster at Outback Lodge. $3, 10pm.

Herb and Hanson (the "Acoustic duo of destruction") play blues/folk at West Main. No Cover, 10pm.

Robert Jospé (jazz) at Rapture. No cover, 7:30pm. (W)

Satisfaction with Noel Sanger (dance party) at Rapture. $3/Ladies free, 10:30pm. (W)

Middle Eastern Belly Dance Class at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 6:30pm. (W)

Eek-A-Mouse (reggae) at Starr Hill. $15/$12 advance, 9pm.

Kait and Thom (modern jazz duo) at Tokyo Rose upstairs. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Rick Diamond (12-2pm) and Michael Dubvsky (6-8pm) at Veggie Heaven. No cover.

FRIDAY, July 30
ART
Cultural Copy:
Jennifer Herd, an Australian Aboriginal artist from Queensland,, speaks on "Visual Conversations on Indigenous Art and Cultural Appropriation." 7pm. Reservations required. 244-0234.

KidsMake: Visit Art Camp, Scrambled Arts, Free Arts, and Arts and Crafts Corner to see creations by participants in the Boys & Girls Club summer part program. 6-8pm. Meet and congratulate the young artists at the reception afterward. Dickinson Theater, PVCC, 501 College Drive. 977-2001. See Family feature.

FAMILY
Storybook Dance:
Young thespians ages 2-5 can climb on stage at the Virginia Discovery Museum as they sing and dance and bring to life stories from different areas around the world. This week features Australia. Come in costume if you like. Sessions at 10:30, 11, and 11:30am. Included in the price of admission. East end of the Downtown Mall. 977-1025.

WALKABOUT
Fridays After 5:
The popular outdoor concert series continues. This week's act is English Channel.

Polo Club: The Charlottesville Polo Club plays several times a week between Memorial Day and Labor Day, but the big event is still tonight. 6:30 and 8pm. $4 (children under 12 free). Virginia Polo Center at Forest Lodge Farm on Old Lynchburg Road. (1082 Forest Lodge Lane) 977-7656 or mtnmule@comclin.net.

PERFORMANCE
Spoken Word Night: Live Arts pays homage to the word in its air-conditioned "pleasure garden"– complete with faux sunsets, foliage, and gnomes. Boxed In by Elizabeth Rose Fuller and Bird Watching by Alex Citron, 8-9pm; women perform monologues, 9-10pm; poetry lounge, 10-11. Live Arts Down Stage. 123 E. Water St. 977-4177x100.

Barber of Seville: Figaro, the lovable but meddlesome town barber, headlines the Ash-Lawn Opera Festival in this Rossini classic, a comedic opera about deception, jealousy, and true love. Sung in English without the aid of microphones. 8pm. Ash Lawn-Highland, off Route 795. $15-24. 293-4500. See Performance feature.

Jar the Floor: Four generations of women gather to celebrate the 90th birthday of the eldest in their clan in this Cheryl L. West play, one of four in repertory this summer. Live Arts Upstage, 123 E. Water St. 7pm. $8; $3 beer garden. 977-4177x100.

Three Days of Rain: This Richard Greenberg play about a son unraveling the mystery that was his father anchors tonight's Summer Theater doubleheader. Live Arts Upstage, 123 E. Water St. $8; $3 beer garden; buy tickets in person only. 977-4177x100.

Shakespeare at the Ruins: Four County Players performs Much Ado About Nothing in its 15th annual festival at the ruins of the Barboursville Vineyards. Gates open 90 minutes ahead of each performance so visitors can stroll around the grounds and bring picnics, or order a $15 meal at least two days in advance. Sorry, no alcohol– unless you want to try the local wine, which is available for purchase. 20 miles north of Charlottesville at Routes 33 and 20. 8pm. $12-18. 540-832-5355.

Driving Miss Daisy: Tinged with humor and pathos, this play explores the evolving relationship between a stubborn Jewish matron and her loyal black chauffeur at the height of the civil-rights movement. 8pm. Culbreth Theatre. $14-20. 924-3376.

A Midsummer Night's Dream: Titania, Oberon, and Puck are at it again in this Shenandoah Shakespeare production of one of the bard's most hilarious comedies. 7:30pm. Blackfriars Playhouse, 10 S. Market St., Staunton. $10-28. 540-885-5588.

Snoopy: See Thursday, July 29.

TUNES
Jay Pun on the Patio at Garden of Sheba:
Pun's excellent guitar work and emotive lyrics are new on the circuit, but the buzz is big. No cover, 8pm.

Bob Margolin at Outback Lodge: Margolin's Chicago Blues style guitar is just what the Lodge needs– he played in Muddy Waters' band from '73-'80, so you know he has the chord patterns down. $7, 10pm.

Navel with TOW and Father of Twelve at Starr Hill: Navel's hard rock with style moves upstairs for this show– a limited number of their new five-song EP will be on sale, so if you want one, come early. $5, 9pm.

NC's Rufus Grove hit West Main with a psychedelic blues, funk, and rock explosion. No cover, 10pm.

The Hamiltons at Orbit. No cover, 10:30pm.

DJ Lem at Atomic Burrito. No cover, 10pm.

Vernon Fisher ("romantic side of jazz") at Keswick Hall. No cover, 6:30pm. (W)

Junior Moment (folk rock) at Rapunzel's. No cover, 8pm.

African Show Boyz at Shebeen. No cover, 9pm.

Casiotone for the Painfully Alone and VHS & the Babies at Tokyo Rose. $5, 10pm.

Charlotte Hisey (12-2pm) and Andrew McAteer (6-8pm) at Veggie Heaven. No cover.

SATURDAY, July 31
FAMILY
Movie Madness:
Gordon Avenue Library hosts Saturday Morning at the Movies with a festival of favorite films. Call or check the bulletin board for weekly titles. Preschoolers should be accompanied by a parent. No registration required. 11am. Free. 1500 Gordon Ave. 296-5544.

Summer Saturdays: Ash Lawn-Highland kicks off its popular summer Saturday theater series for families with "Let's Do Opera." Keswick Area Arts Association presents a comic look into the creation of opera. Bring a picnic. 11am rain or shine. $5. 1000 James Monroe Parkway. 293-4500.

Fun for Everyone: Louisa County host its first Family Fun Fest with hands-on activities, rides, carnival games, wellness and educational activities, moon walk, obstacle course, fire and emergency vehicles, crafter, food, and more. Louisa Town Park. 11am-3pm. Free. Meadow Ave. 540-967-0069.

Tell Me a Story: Little literati ages 5 and up can enjoy summer favorites during story time at Barnes & Noble. They'll read some fun stories and serve up cookies, too. 11:30am. Free. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-6598.

WALKABOUT
Polo Match:
Join the Piedmont Polo Club (formerly Piedmont Women's Polo Club but now all-inclusive) for a night of polo action in the rolling hills of Albemarle County. 7pm. Polo Grounds Road, off Old Lynchburg Road. 296-3472 or lpa@aol.com.

Dog Training: Nationally known dog trainer Teoti Anderson visits Charlottesville to teach a course on transforming ill-mannered pups into happy, obedient dogs. 9am-4pm. $85 fee, registration required. allthingspawssible.com or 293-5836.

African American Cultural Arts Festival: This community celebration is back for its 15th year. Storytelling, music, dancing, food, crafts, and more. Free. Washington Park. 980-3164 or cvilleafrican-amfest.com. See Walkabout feature.

Nature Photography: Join professional photographers Rob and Ann Simpson to learn the artistic and technical aspects of capturing nature on film during this two-day field seminar. $70 fee, registration required. Shenandoah National Park. 540-999-3489 or nps.gov/shen/seminars.html to register or for details.

Tomato Tasting: Monticello's Maggie Stemann Thomson hosts a workshop on "everyone's favorite homegrown vegetable." Sample different varieties of tomatoes and learn about the plant's surprising genetic diversity. 9:30am. $10 fee, reservations required. Monticello Garden Shop. 984-9822 or monticello.org.

Oakencroft Tomato/Salsa Fest: Celebrate the mid-summer tomato bounty at Oakencroft Vineyard's annual salsa fest. Tastings, tours and fresh tomato treats. 11am-5pm. 296-4188 or oakencroft.com.

Morning Nature Hike: Join a Wintergreen Nature Foundation naturalist for an interpretive hike in the woods. 10am every Saturday and Sunday. $5 fee ($3 for Foundation members), registration is required. 325-8169 or twnf.org.

Bead Embroidery: Studio Baboo instructor Pat Snowadsky teaches this hands-on class, in which students sample various bead stitches and learn the basics of embroidering with beads. 10am-1pm. $60 fee includes materials. 106 Fifth St. Downtown Mall. 244-2905.

PERFORMANCE
Merchant of Venice:
Money, love, justice, mercy, and a pound of flesh– this Shakespearean comedy has it all. 2pm. Blackfriars Playhouse, 10 S. Market St., Staunton. $10-28. 540-885-5588.

Anton in Show Business: See Thursday, July 29. Tonight's show is at 9pm.

Shakespeare at the Ruins: See Friday, July 30.

Snoopy: See Thursday, July 29. Add a 2pm show to the 7:30pm performance today.

Annie: See Thursday, July 29.

Wonderful Summer: See Thursday, July 29. Tonight's show is at 7pm.

Driving Miss Daisy: See Friday, July 30. Today's show is a 2pm matinee.

Five Guys Named Moe: See Thursday, July 29.

The Most Lamentable Comedy: See Thursday, July 29.

TUNES
Inner Space at Coupe DeVille's:
Inner Space are really good at what they do, playing their instruments with ease, wank-free. No cover, 10pm.

The Brides with No Gods No Monsters at the Outback Lodge: The horror movie vibe of the Brides from NYC will mesh well with the local No Gods No Monsters, who have their own version of ominous happening. $6, 10pm. See Tunes feature.

Danny Schmidt & Paul Curreri at Starr Hill: Two luminary guitar players on one stage– one night only. Schmidt brings his complicated guitar and plaintive voice while Curreri brings his equally exquisite playing and high-flying voice to an evening of songwriting shenanigans. $10/$8 advance, 9pm.

Victor Cabas (blues) at Basic Necessities. No cover, 6:30pm. (W)

Populist Dancing at Club Rio. $10, 9pm. (W)

Fair Weather Bums at Shebeen. No cover, 10pm.

No Evil with Vyktoria Pratt-Keating at Gravity Lounge. $5, 8pm.

J Pun's Brownfolk (J Pun on guitar, Johnny Gilmore on drums) show their skill at West Main. No cover, 10pm.

Monsters at the Outback Lodge. $6, 10pm.

The Red Hot Chilly Pickers (old time string band) at Rapunzels. $5, 8pm.

Boaz at Garden of Sheba. No cover, 8pm.

DJ night with DJ Camille at Tokyo Rose. $5, 10pm.

SUNDAY, August 1
WALKABOUT
African American Cultural Arts Festival:
Continues today. See July 31 and Walkabout feature.

Oakencroft Tomato/Salsa Fest: More tomato fun at Oakencroft. See Saturday, July 31.

PERFORMANCE
Sunday Salsa:
The Charlottesville Salsa Club sponsors a weekly opportunity to learn and practice Salsa and other dances, in a smoke-free nightclub atmosphere. A basic lesson (usually salsa) gets the evening started at 8. DJ'd music is 80 percent salsa mixed with other Latin styles. Complimentary water and sodas. The Outback Lodge, 917 Preston Ave. 8pm-12am. $5 (members $3). 979-7211. cvillesalsaclub.com.

Midsummer Night's Dream: See Thursday, July 29. Today's show is at 2pm.

Shakespeare at the Ruins: See Friday, July 30. Today's show is at 6:30pm.

Barber of Seville: See Friday, July 30.

TUNES
Leon Russell at Gravity Lounge: Russell's responsible for such hits as Joe Cocker's, "Delta Lady," The Carpenters' "Superstar," and Ray Charles' "A Song For You." A living legend comes to town. $35/$30, 7pm.

The Hogwaller Ramblers (bluegrass mayhem) at Escafé. No cover, 10pm. (W)

B.C. at Miller's. No cover, 10:30pm. (W)

Irish Music Session at Shebeen. No cover, 3-6pm. (W)

George Turner at Orbit. No cover, 10:30pm.

MONDAY, August 2
PERFORMANCE
Snoopy:
See Thursday, July 29.

Driving Miss Daisy: See Friday, July 30.

FAMILY
Books into Movies:
Hollywood has adapted young adult literature into some great (and not so great) movies. This summer, the folks at Northside Library invite teens entering grades 7-10 to compare the two genres. Each week participants will read a book, then come to the library for a film screening and discussion. Snacks provided. 3:30-5:30pm. Free. Registration required. Albemarle Square. 973-7893.

TUNES
Cex, Make believe, and Fallout Countdown at Tokyo Rose:
Rjyan Kidwell, the man behind the hip-hop oriented Cex, is also founder of the label Tigerbeat 6, while the Fallout Countdown are part local, and play "dance-punk"– just what you've been waiting for. $5, 10pm.

Open Mic Night with Charles Davis at Baja Bean. No cover, signup 8:30pm/9pm. (W)

George Melvin (piano merriment) at South Street Brewery. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Travis Elliot (pop) and John Figura at the Virginian. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Rose Purdy (12-2pm) and Grasping at Laws (5:30-7:30pm) at Veggie Heaven. No cover.

TUESDAY, August 3
PERFORMANCE
Snoopy:
See Thursday, July 29.

Annie: See Thursday, July 29.

True West: In this dark comedy by Sam Shepard, two estranged brothers– a drifter and a writer– come together to work on a screenplay, discovering they're more alike than they would like. The Heritage Repertory Theatre introduces the first of six performances tonight. Mature audiences recommended. 8pm, and the show is sign-language interpreted. Culbreth Theatre. $14-20. 924-3376.

FAMILY
Golf Classes:
Charlottesville Recreation and Leisure Services offers Tiger Woods wannabes the chance to perfect their swing in a four-week series of golf classes at Meadowcreek Golf Course starting tonight. Classes are Tuesdays from 5-6:30pm. $50 City residents, $75 others. 970-3264.

Reel Time: Regal Cinema offers a summer full of free movies for kids. This week's shows are The King and I (G) and Agent Cody Banks! (PG). 10am. Seminole Square (behind Kmart). 980-3333.

Totally Tie-Dye: Teens entering grades 6-12 get psyched at Central Library in a tie-dye workshop. Wear grubby clothes, but bring a clean cotton t-shirt or bandana to dye. 3-4pm. Free. Registration required. 201 E. Market St. 979-7151, ext. 3.

Sing and Spin: Audience participation is strongly advised when Dee Kysor, George Crafts, and their puppet pals spin tales from around the world and sing both traditional and original songs at Central Library. 10:30am. Free. 201 E. Market St. 979-7151, ext. 3.

Sweet Treat: Crozet Library celebrates the completion of their Summer Reading Program with an ice cream social. The lovable Teddy bear Corduroy will be on hand to shake your hand. 7pm. Free. In the old train station on Three Notch'd Road. 823-4050.

TUNES
Tim Burnett and Friends (6-8pm) at Veggie Heaven. No cover.

Karaoke Night (what you make of it) at Baja Bean. Free, 8pm. (W)

Jamie and Rolland (partial bluegrass mayhem) at the Blue Moon Diner. No cover, 8pm. (W)

Glen Mack (rock) at Coupe DeVille's. No cover, 10:30pm. (W)

Jimmy O at the Lazy Parrot Grill on Pantops. No cover, 8pm. (W)

Snug (funk improv) at Michael's Bistro. $3, 10pm. (W)

$2 Tuesdays w/ Big Circle at Outback Lodge. No cover, 10pm. (W)

WEDNESDAY, August 4
PERFORMANCE
Snoopy:
See Thursday, July 29.

Barber of Seville: See Friday, July 30.

Five Guys Named Moe: See Thursday, July 29. See Thursday, July 29.

The Most Lamentable Comedy: See Thursday, July 29.

FAMILY
Tales for Tots:
The 5 and under crowd can hear storyteller favorites at Barnes & Noble's preschool story time. 10:30am. Free. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-6598.

Wacky Wednesday: Young readers are invited to check out the library today where someone has made some wacky changes in the children's area and in the staff. Find some of them and take home some a wacky prize. Gordon Avenue Library, 296-5544 and Northside Library, Albemarle Square, 973-7893.

Reel Time: See Tuesday, August 3.

WORDS
Where Are We?:
Paul Gaston discusses Where we Stand: Voices of Southern Dissent and reads from his own contribution to the book. Noon. New Dominion Bookshop. 404 E. Main St. 295-2552. See Words feature.

WALKABOUT
Voice of the Wilderness:
Celebrate the passage of the Wilderness Act on a moderately strenuous 6-mile hike through the Blue Ridge with a certified naturalist. $40 fee, registration required. Shenandoah National Park. 540-999-3489 or nps.gov/shen/seminars.html.

Sacred Journey: Healing through the arts without chemotherapy or radiation. 6:45pm. Central Library's Madison Room. Melinda Elliott. 295-5523.

Aromatic Herbs: Nancy McAdams leads a workshop in herbs and potpourri. Learn about the properties of fragrant combinations, and take home your own floral creation. 1pm or 3pm. Regular admission plus $2, reservations recommended. Ash Lawn-Highland, 1000 James Monroe Parkway. 293-9539 or ashlawnhighland.org.

Blue Ridge Up Close: Join Wintergreen Nature Foundation Director Doug Coleman for an exciting day of learning about Virginia's natural history. 10am. $15 ($10 Foundation members). Bring a bag lunch. 325-8169 or twnf.org for details and registration.

TUNES
Avett Brothers with The Pones at Gravity Lounge:
Relaxed and original describes this bluegrass band, definitely one of the best similar type acts to come through town. $5, 8pm.

Man Mountain Jr. at Outback Lodge: Funk band MMJr. rocks it at Outback Lodge, laying down a learned beat that emphasizes a tight sound. No cover, 10pm.

Kathy Compton at the Blue Moon Diner. No cover, 8pm. (W)

Cheesy Trivia with M&M Express at Buffalo Wild Wings. No cover, 8:30pm. (W)

Benny Dodd (rock covers) at Coupe DeVille's. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Travis Elliott at Orbit. No cover, 10:30pm

Open Mic Night at Dew Drop Inn. No cover, 7:30pm. (W)

Country Dance Night (couples and line) at Fry Spring Beach Club. $7/$4 students, lessons 7-8pm, dancing 8-11pm. (W)

The Mike Rosensky Jeff Decker Quartet (jazz) at Miller's. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Travis Elliott at Orbit. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Open Jam at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 7pm. (W)

Middle Eastern Belly Dance Class at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 6:30pm. (W)

Kathy Olsen Trio (jazz) upstairs at Tokyo Rose. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Karaoke Night at West Main. No Cover, 10pm.

Jim Davies (acoustic rock and blues) at the Virginian. No cover, 10pm. (W)

THURSDAY, August 5
WALKABOUT
Attention Free Spirits:
Michael Grosso offers a seminar on philosophy and psychotherapy at the Quest bookshop. No charge. 7-9pm. 619 E. Main St. 295-3377.

FAMILY
Paper Making:
Teens entering grades 6-12 can find out how found objects can be turned into paper. B.G. Stinchfield shows how colorful paper can be made from flowers, napkins, lint, feathers, tissue paper, sheet music, and more at Scottsville Library.2-4pm. Free. Registration required. 330 Bird St. 286-3541.

PERFORMANCE
Driving Miss Daisy:
See Friday, July 30. Tonight show– the final performance of the run– is sign-interpreted.

Midsummer Night's Dream: See Thursday, July 29.

Annie: See Thursday, July 29.

Snoopy: See Thursday, July 29.

TUNES
Jim Waive (country-folk) at the Blue Moon Diner. Free, 8pm (W)

Jalapeno Cornbread brings their eclectic and fun rock show to West Main. No Cover, 10pm.

Karaoke Night with DJ Wild Wes at Buffalo Wild Wings. Free, 9pm (W)

Danny Beirne (piano-man) at Coupe DeVille's. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Chicken Head Blues Band at Dürty Nelly's. $4, 9pm. (W)

The FRUiT Trio with Regan at Gravity Lounge. $15/$12 advance, 8:30pm.

Thompson/ D'earth and friends (freeform jazz) at Miller's. $4, 10pm. (W)

Hard Rock Night at Outback Lodge. $3, 10pm.

Robert Jospé (jazz) at Rapture. No cover, 7:30pm. (W)

Satisfaction with Noel Sanger (dance party) at Rapture. $3/Ladies free, 10:30pm. (W)

Middle Eastern Belly Dance Class at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 6:30pm. (W)

Kait and Thom (modern jazz duo) at Tokyo Rose upstairs. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Rick Diamond 12-2pm and Michael Dubovsky (6-8pm) at Veggie Heaven. No cover.

FRIDAY, August 6
WORDS
Asian-American Poets Emerge:
A summer reading by Marilyn Chin, David Rick Barot, and Ishle Park. The reading caps the first national summer retreat sponsored by Kundiman, a non-profit committed to nurturing Asian-American poets. Participants read from their work. 8pm. Newcomb Hall, Alderman Road. 924-6675 or kundiman.org.

FAMILY
Get Your Kicks:
The Brazil Soccer Team conducts a soccer clinic for kids at the Green County Community Park. No registration required. Just show up. And it's free! 9:30-11:30am. 974-7422.

On the Frontier: The Frontier Culture Museum hosts a free First Fridays event designed to let folks see what the museum has to offer. Have a picnic, then wander down to the four historic farms for a living history presentation. Concessions available. 6:30-8:30pm. Free. Rt. 250 west in Staunton. 540-332-7850, ext. 165. frontiermuseum.org.

Star struck: The view is out of this world at Public Night at McCormick Observatory from 9-11pm (weather permitting). UVA's research telescopes on O-Hill will be pointed heavenward, and Astronomy Department staff and students will be on hand with a slide show and answers to starry questions. Free. McCormick Road. 924-7494.

Storybook Dance: See Friday, July 30.

WALKABOUT
Fridays After 5:
This week's act: Grateful Dead cover band Alligator.

Polo Club: See Friday, July 30.

PERFORMANCE
True West:
See Tuesday, August 3. Final performance tonight at 8pm.

Merchant of Venice: See Saturday, July 31. Today's show is at 7:30pm.

Snoopy: See Thursday, July 29. Chat with the cast and director after the show tonight.

Shakespeare at the Ruins: See Friday, July 30.

Barber of Seville: See Friday, July 30.

TUNES
Palomar, My Teenage Stride, and the Smittens at Tokyo Rose:
The show to beat this summer features pop-till-you-drop, from three bands who all recently performed at the Athens Popfest. Palomar's gal-fronted harmony and clever writing will be the highlight of the night, though all the acts are top of the pops. $5, 10pm.

Andrew McAteer (6-8pm) at Veggie Heaven. No cover.

Vernon Fisher ("romantic side of jazz") at Keswick Hall. No cover, 6:30pm. (W)

Sparky's Flaw at Gravity Lounge. $5, 7pm.

Jackass Flats at Gravity Lounge. $5, 9:30pm.

William Walter and Tucker Rodgers (acoustic) at West Main. No cover, 10 pm.

Bella Morte at Outback Lodge. $6, 10pm.

Max Collins at Orbit. No cover, 10:30pm.

SATURDAY, August 7
WORDS
A Day to Remember:
59 years ago, on August 6, the world witnessed an act of war that changed political consciences around the world when a nuclear bomb dropped from the Enola Gay onto Hiroshima. Three days later, a mushroom cloud loomed over Nagasaki. Take time to reflect on what this history means to our future as the Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice holds a Hiroshima/Nagasaki Annual Commemoration from 11am-4pm at the Central Place on the Downtown Mall. Info, 961-6278 or 456-8176.

WALKABOUT
Bird Walk:
Join Dave Hogg for a morning bird walk at the Ivy Creek Natural Area. 7:30am. Free. No experience necessary. 973-7772 or avenue.org/icf.

Polo Match: See Saturday, July 31.

Durable Native Plants: Enjoy this slide presentation and visit to Kemper Park to analyze native trees and shrubs for their adaptive use in landscape plantings. 9:30am. Meet at the Visitors Center. $10 fee, registration required. Monticello. 984-9822 or monticello.org.

Ruffles and Flourishes: Studio Baboo instructor Louise Smith offers a class in curved and ruffled peyote stitches. 10am-2:30pm. $35 fee. 106 Fifth St. Downtown Mall. 244-2905.

FAMILY
Summer Saturdays:
Foxes, crows, tortoises, and hares. The award-winning puppets from Applause Unlimited come to Ash Lawn Highland to put their unique spin on the timeless tales of Aesop's Fables. Bring a picnic. 11am rain or shine. $5. 1000 James Monroe Parkway. 293-4500.

Maymont Mammals: Young explorers ages 5 and up discover similarities and differences between some of the 80 mammals that live at Maymont during a program "Bunnies, Bats, & Bears." Kids meet a rabbit, feel otter fur, examine a raccoon skull and bobcat teeth, study bats, and take an outdoor hike to see the bears. 10am. $6 per parent/child pair.

More adventures await young explorers at Maymont where they can soar into the world of birds with an animal encounter that includes fun facts and a close-up glimpse of one of Maymont's owls. 1pm. $3 per person. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Register at the Visitor Desk on the day of the program. 2201 Shields Lake Drive. 804-358-7166, ext. 333.

Tell Me a Story: See Saturday, July 31.

Get Your Kicks: See Friday, August 6. Today's clinic is at Baker-Butler Elementary School. 2740 Proffit Road.

PERFORMANCE
The Most Lamentable Comedy:
See Thursday, July 29. Today's show is a 2pm matinee.

Snoopy: See Thursday, July 29. There's a 2pm performance today before the final show of the run, tonight's 7:30 performance.

Midsummer Night's Dream: See Thursday, July 29.

Annie: See Thursday, July 29.

Shakespeare at the Ruins: See Friday, July 30.

Five Guys Named Moe: See Thursday, July 29. Before tonight's final performance at 8pm, there's a 2pm matinee.

TUNES
Victor Cabas (blues) at Basic Necessities. No cover, 6:30pm. (W)

Populist Dancing at Club Rio. $10, 9pm. (W)

Frontbutt at Outback Lodge. $6, 10pm.

Rock 'n roll Burlesque (go-go dance night) at Tokyo Rose. $5, 10:30pm.

Snug at Orbit. No cover, 10:30pm.

Nickeltown with Sue Garner & Angel Dean at Gravity Lounge. $5, 8:30pm.

SUNDAY, August 8
PERFORMANCE
Barber of Seville:
See Friday, July 30.

Shakespeare at the Ruins: See Friday, July 30. Today's show is at 6:30pm.

Merchant of Venice: See Saturday, July 31.

WALKABOUT
Many Paths:
Unity Church sponsors an ecumenical lecture series, "Many Paths, One Presence." Shaykh Abdullah Nooruddeen Durkee, former professor of Islamic Philosophy at al-Azhar University in Cairo, speaks today at 10:30am on Islam. Q&A session at 1pm. Senior Center, 1180 Pepsi Place, one block east of Rt. 29 off Greenbrier Drive. 978-1062.

TUNES
DJ Malc G at Atomic Burrito. No cover, 10pm.

The Hogwaller Ramblers (bluegrass mayhem) at Escafe. No cover, 10pm. (W)

B.C. at Miller's. No cover, 10:30pm. (W)

Irish Music Session at Shebeen. No cover, 3-6pm. (W)

Morrison Brothers at Gravity Lounge. $5, 8pm.

MONDAY, August 9
WALKABOUT
Scuba Club:
Michael Murphy, a representative from the NOAA's National Marine Sanctuaries Program, presents "Preserving Our Underwater Treasures" at the monthly meeting of the SeaDevil Divers. 6:30pm. Free. Rococo's Restaurant. 975-5570 or SeaDevilDivers.com.

TUNES
Open Mic Night with Charles Davis at Baja Bean.
No cover, signup 8:30pm/9pm. (W)

George Melvin (piano merriment) at South Street Brewery. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Travis Elliot (pop) and John Figura at the Virginian. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Rose Purdy (12-2pm) and Grasping at Laws (5:30-7:30pm) at Veggie Heaven. No cover.

Tuesday, August 10
FAMILY
Reel Time:
See Tuesday, August 4. This week's shows are Jimmy Neutron (G) and Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas (PG).

PERFORMANCE
Annie:
See Thursday, July 29.

Midsummer Night's Dream: See Thursday, July 29. Tonight is "family night," and the show is at 6:30pm.

WALKABOUT
It's a Snap:
The Charlottesville camera club meets to discuss successes and tips– this month with a focus on photographing plants. Visitors welcome. 6:30pm. Turtle Creek Club House, 100 Turtle Creek Road. 973-4856.

TUNES
Karaoke Night (what you make of it) at Baja Bean. Free, 8pm. (W)

Jamie and Rolland (partial bluegrass mayhem) at the Blue Moon Diner. No cover, 8pm. (W)

Glen Mack (rock) at Coupe DeVille's. No cover, 10:30pm. (W)

Jimmy O at Pantops' Lazy Parrot Grill. No cover, 8pm. (W)

Snug (funk improv) at Michael's Bistro. $3, 10pm. (W)

$2 Tuesdays with Big Circle at Outback Lodge. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Tim Burnett and Friends (6-8pm) at Veggie Heaven. No cover.

Granian with Heidi Hensley at Gravity Lounge. $10/$8 advanced, 8pm.

WEDNESDAY, August 11
ART
Tucker Box Tour:
Enjoy a guided tour of the current exhibitions at the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection followed by lunch in the gallery. Bring your own lunch or order one for $7. 12:15-1:30 pm. Worrell Drive, Pantops. Reservations required. 244-0234.

FAMILY
Wacky Wednesday:
See Wednesday, August 4. Today's mix-ups happen at Central Library. 201 E. Market St. 979-7151, ext. 3. Also at Crozet Library in the old train station on Three Notch'd Road. 823-4050. Also at Scottsville Library. 330 Bird St. 286-3541.

Crafty: See Wednesday, August 4. Today's focus is candle making with Russell Hubert.

Try It Out: See Thursday, July 29. Today's program is Teddy Bear Tea.

Reel Time: See Tuesday, August 10.

PERFORMANCE
Midsummer Night's Dream:
See Thursday, July 29.

Barber of Seville: See Friday, July 30, and Walkabout feature.

TUNES
Fastball and the Clarks at Starr Hill:
Taking you way back to 1998 is Fastball, whose song "That Way" was the soundtrack to many sophomore year of college make-outs. $10/$8, 8pm.

Kathy Compton at the Blue Moon Diner. No cover, 8pm. (W)

Cheesy Trivia with M&M Express at Buffalo Wild Wings. No cover, 8:30pm. (W)

Benny Dodd (rock covers) at Coupe DeVille's. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Travis Elliott at Orbit. No cover, 10:30pm.

Open Mic Night at Dew Drop Inn. No cover, 7:30pm. (W)

Country Dance Night (couples and line) at Fry Spring Beach Club. $7/$4 students, lessons 7-8pm, dancing 8-11pm. (W)

The Mike Rosensky Jeff Decker Quartet (jazz) at Miller's. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Travis Elliott at Orbit. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Jamal Millner and Friends at Outback Lodge. No cover, 10pm.

Open Jam at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 7pm. (W)

Middle Eastern Belly Dance Class at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 6:30pm. (W)

Kathy Olsen Trio (jazz) upstairs at Tokyo Rose. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Jim Davies (acoustic rock and blues) at the Virginian. No cover, 10pm. (W)

THURSDAY, AUGUST 12
FAMILY
Kids Day Out:
Mommy & Me (and Daddy too) gets ready for back to school at Barracks Road Shopping Center. Catch the bus, meet Clifford the Big Red Dog, listen to stories, do arts and crafts, and more. 10am-noon. Free. Barracks Rd. 977-4583.

WALKABOUT
Wire Wrapped Pendant:
Studio Baboo instructor Stephen Beauch teaches the technique for making an elegant wire wrapped cabochon pendant. 10am-1pm. $35 fee includes materials. 106 Fifth St. Downtown Mall. 244-2905.

PERFORMANCE
Annie:
See Thursday, July 29.

Merchant of Venice: See Saturday, July 31.

TUNES
Jim Waive (country-folk) at the Blue Moon Diner. Free, 8pm (W)

Karaoke Night with DJ Wild Wes at Buffalo Wild Wings. Free, 9pm (W)

Keith Morris, Joe Pollock & Jeff Romano at Gravity Lounge. $5, 8:30pm.

Danny Beirne (piano-man) at Coupe DeVille's. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Chicken Head Blues Band at Dürty Nelly's. $4, 9pm. (W)

Thompson/ D'earth and friends (freeform jazz) at Miller's. $4, 10pm. (W)

Hard Rock Night at Outback Lodge. $3, 10pm.

Robert Jospé (jazz) at Rapture. No cover, 7:30pm. (W)

Satisfaction with Noel Sanger (dance party) at Rapture. $3/Ladies free, 10:30pm. (W)

Middle Eastern Belly Dance Class at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 6:30pm. (W)

Kait and Thom (modern jazz duo) at Tokyo Rose upstairs. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Upcoming and Ongoing
ART
New McGuffey Hours:
McGuffey is now open one extra hour per day, five days a week– Tuesdays through Saturdays until 6pm. Closed Monday, Sunday 1-5pm. Now you can stop by after work! 201 Second St. NW. 295-7973 mcguffeyartcenter.com.

PERFORMANCE
Live Arts Playwright's Lab:
Playwrights can find a safe and inspirational place to hone their writing skills, develop new material, and revise working manuscripts. Open to all levels of experience. Meets every first and third Mondays of the month, 6:30-9:30pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. Free. 977-4177x100.

Jigsaw Dancing: Advanced beginners are invited to attend weekly workshops at the McGuffey Art Center's Studio 20. Learn modern techniques, floor barre, jazz, historical dance and more. Selections change each week. One modern and one novelty class held daily, 2-4pm. McGuffey Art Center, 201 Second St. NW. $25/week. 973-3744.

WORDS
Dust off that manuscript:
There's still room for eager authors in the Writing Center's weekend workshop, "Publishing Nuts and Bolts," run by Jeffrey Levine, editor and publisher at Tupelo Press in Vermont. The workshop runs from Friday, August 13, at 6pm to Sunday, August 15, at noon and costs $175 ($157.50 for Writing Center members). 293-3702 or cvillewrites.org.

Check It Out Now: The Gordon Avenue Branch of the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library will be closed from Friday, August 13, to Tuesday, August 24, for re-carpeting. No excuse to be late returning books, though: Drop off will still be open, or you can always return JMRL books at any other branch. Questions? 296-5544.

Dialogue Café: Charlottesville's popular international forum has expanded hours. Adult English language learners and native speakers can now gather Tuesdays, 9-11am, Wednesdays, 6-8pm and Thursdays 10:30-12pm. Adult Learning Center, 1000 Preston Ave, across from Washington Park. 245-2815.

FAMILY
For Families Only:
Monticello offers tours designed especially for children ages 6-11 and their families. The tours include touchable objects and a child-friendly focus. On the hour from 10am-3pm daily through August 15. Included in the price of admission. Register at the ticket office. Thomas Jefferson Parkway (Rt. 53). 984-9822.

Antarctic Adventure: "Men wanted for hazardous journey. Small wages. Bitter cold. Long months of complete darkness. Constant danger. Safe return doubtful …" The year is 1914 and explorer Ernest Shackleton uses this recruitment poster to lure 27 ordinary men for the adventure of their lives: an attempt to be the first human beings to cross Antarctica. The Science Museum of Virginia details the inglorious expedition in super size with the IMAX film Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure opening today and running through September 17. 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. 800-659-1727. smv.org.

G'Day, Mate!: The Virginia Discovery Museum goes to the ends of the earth to explore the island of Australia this summer. The Back Gallery exhibit "Outback & Down Under"invites visitors to bounce like a kangaroo, create Aboriginal rock art, discover the secrets of the bush country, and more. Included in the price of admission. East end of the Downtown Mall. 977-1025.

Eat or be Eaten: Adventurous types can step into a dog-eat-dog world and find out "Who's for Dinner?" at an exhibit at the Virginia Museum of Natural History. Taxidermied specimens, puppets, and interactive activities help explorers learn about the unusual ways animals hunt for their food and protect themselves from predators. Open Monday-Thursday 10am-4pm. Free. 104 Emmet St. 982-4605. virginia.edu/vmnh-uva.

Big Bones: China may be a world away, but now through September 6 kids can play with replicas of ancient dinosaur skeletons right down the road at the Children's Museum of Richmond. Lots of hands-on exhibits. Most activities are free with museum admission. The museum is open 9:30am-5pm Tuesday through Saturday, noon-5pm on Sunday. Admission is $7. 2626 W. Broad St., Richmond. 804-474-2667. c-mor.org.

Blast from the Past: The Science Museum of Virginia invites kids of all ages to come and play with their toys at the new exhibit Kid Stuff: Great Toys from Our Childhood on display though September 6. Included in the price of exhibit admission. 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. 800-659-1727. smv.org.

Gentlemen, Start your Engines!: The pressure. The teamwork. The danger. The speed. The fans. The groundbreaking IMAX® film NASCAR: The IMAX Experience thrusts you into the driver's seat to experience a visceral journey inside America's most popular spectator sport at the Science Museum of Virginia. Runs through September 17. Call or see website for schedule and cost. 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. 800-659-1727. smv.org.

WALKABOUT
Mindfulness Meditation:
Tuesdays 12:15-12:45pm. UVA Hospital Chapel. Meditation practice with guidance. Free. No experience necessary. 924-1190.

Morning Nature Hike: Join a Wintergreen Nature Foundation naturalist for an interpretive hike in the woods. 10am every Saturday and Sunday. $5 fee ($3 Foundation members), registration required. 325-8169 or twnf.org.

Streamwatch Water Monitoring: Join John Murphy of the Rivanna Conservation Society for a trip to assess watershed health at several sites along the Rivanna River. Contact the RCS for info and to find other certified monitors in your area. 589-7576 or rcs@avenue.org

Parkway Nature Walks: Monticello is offering guided walking tours of the Thomas Jefferson Parkway, the linear park along the Route 53 entrance to Jefferson's estate, every Sunday morning now through the end of November. 9:30am. No fee. Meet at Kemper Park at the base of the Parkway, a quarter-mile east of the intersection of Route 53 and Route 20. 984-9822.

Downtown Tours: The Albemarle-Charlottesville Historical Society offers walking tours of historic downtown Charlottesville every Saturday at 10am. Tours leave from the McIntire Building across from Lee Park and cover over 250 years of community history in one hour. $3 suggested donation. 296-1492.

Visit Montpelier: Montpelier offers two outdoor walking tours each Saturday, one focusing on the plantation's slave community, and another on the more recent duPont estate. Afterwards, go behind the scenes and see rooms that are not regularly open to the public and areas of the house that are under renovation. Offered every half-hour from 10:30am-4pm. montpelier.org for more info.

Monticello Gardens and Grounds: This guided tour explores the flower and vegetable gardens, grove, and orchards around Jefferson's home. Tours begin on the west lawn hourly at fifteen minutes after the hour starting at 9:15am. Fee included in price of general admission. 984-9822.

Ferry the James: The Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society is offering rides on the Hatton Ferry, one of the last poled ferries still in operation in the U.S., across the James River now through October 17. No fee. Open weekends from 9am-5pm. Located near Scottsville on Route 625. 296-1492.

Michie Tavern Tours: Experience living history at the original eighteenth-century Tavern building: dance to a colonial reel, taste tavern punch, and write with a quill pen. The Tavern museum also features a special exhibit on the history of Virginia wines. 11:30am-3:30pm daily. Tours are free to local residents. 977-1234.

Plantation Community Tours: These guided walking tours visit Mulberry Row and other plantation-related sites near the mountaintop and focus on the African-American community at Monticello and the economic operation of the plantation. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes and leaves on the hour from 10am to 3pm from in front of the Monticello Museum Shop.

Nelson County's Farmer's Market: It's an old-fashioned farmer's market under the tent in Nellysford. Stoll among the live music, local crafts, plants, flowers and fresh produce. 8am-noon every Saturday until September. Nelsoncounty.org.

Scottsville Farmers Market: Miss the Charlottesville market on Saturday? Head down the road to Scottsville for all sorts of fresh vegetables, fruits, crafts, and baked goods, served up May through October. 4-7pm. Located off Valley Street in Scottsville. 286-2505.

ART LIST
The Second Street Gallery's summer exhibition, "Altered Interiors," features three melancholic, site-specific installations by Boston artist Chris Gentile in the Main Gallery, and a "more organic" installation by Richmonder Heide Trepanier in the Dove Gallery. SSG's interiors will remain altered through August 14. City Center for Contemporary Arts, corner of Second and E. Water streets. 977-7284.

The University of Virginia Art Museum presents "A Short History of Decay: Sculptures by James Welty" through August 8. Also on view: "A Taste for Grace: Italian Prints from the 15th through 18th Centuries," continuing through August 1, and "American Collage," including work by Andy Warhol, Adja Yunkers, and Robert Motherwell, among others, through August 22. Plus, go large with "Super-Size It," a photography exhibition, on display through August 8. 155 Rugby Road. 924-3952. See Art feature.

Piedmont Virginia Community College opens the Boys & Girls Club of Charlottesville's exhibition "KidsMake: A Summer of Art" on July 30. Reception, 6-8pm. Earl V. Dickinson Building, 501 College Drive. 977-2001. See Family feature, page 39.

The Charlottesville-Albemarle Art Association's annual all-member exhibit hangs at the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport Mezzanine Gallery until August 2. CAAA member paintings by Barbara Ryan and Randy Sights Baskerville are also on the second floor of the Albemarle County Office Building through August.

The Kluge-Ruhe Collection of Aboriginal Art features "Out of Country," through August 14. 400 Worrell Drive, Peter Jefferson Place. 244-0234.

"Built," an exhibition of gouache and mixed-media paintings by Miriam Tobias is on view at Angelo through August 31. 220 E. Main St. on the Downtown Mall. 971-9256.

View "Works on Paper" by Nicole Fortescue at C'ville Coffee through July 31. 1301 Harris St. 971-8588.

Nature Visionary Art features a prolific show by L-15 (aka Bernard Schatz) through August 1. 110 Fourth St. 296-8482.

The Gallery @ 5th & Water displays the oil paintings of Lindsay Michie Eades through July 31. Located in the foyer of the architectural firm of Stoneking/Von Storch. 107 Fifth St. 979-9825.

During July, CODG presents "Diversity's Closet," an exhibition of acrylic paintings by Monty Montgomery, mixed-media work by Garth Fry, found-object art by Sera Davis, and photography by Vicky Baker. 112 E. Main St., under the Jefferson Theater. 242-4212.

New Dominion Bookshop offers Lucy Alford's "Red Clay, Pale Sky," oils on wood from Nelson County, in its Mezzanine Gallery through July. 404 E. Main St. on the Downtown Mall. 295-2552.

During July, the C&O Gallery shows "More than Sculpture," a variety work by David and Christian Breeden. Next door to the C&O Restaurant, 511 E. Water St. 971-7044.

For the month of July, Sage Moon Gallery features "Nature Visions," watercolors by Sharon Hauff. In August, Holly Macaulay's watercolors will be on view. 420 E. Main St. on the Downtown Mall. 977-9997.

Meg West's exhibit, "Summer Paintings in Western Albemarle," is on display through August 31 at Jarman's Gap restaurant in Crozet. 5790 Three Notched Road. 823-4626.

New work by members of the Central Virginia Watercolor Guild, featuring watercolors, oils, pastels, and mixed media is on display at the Albemarle County Courthouse through July 31. 501 E. Jefferson Court Sq. 296-8484.

"Dreamscapes," a collection of new oil paintings by Leslie Allyn, hangs at Ombra's Café in Crozet through August 31. 5773 The Square. 823-5332.

The Dave Moore Studio features a final "Farewell to the Studio" show during July. Hours vary, so call first, but get down there because Dave's moving on to new digs. 414 E. Main St. (under The Twisted Branch Tea Bazaar). 825-1870.

Through August 15, Les Yeux du Monde@dot2dot presents recent sculpture by James Welty, an exhibition in conjunction with Welty's show at the University of Virginia Art Museum. 115 S. First St. 973-5566.

The Thomas Jefferson Memorial Church displays lunar carnival masks created by Christian Breeden through August 1. 717 Rugby Road. 293-8179.

Mountain Air Gallery, Etc. presents artwork by Caro Mayo, Ann McCartney, and Jack Brandt during July. 107 and 111 E. Main St. on the Downtown Mall. 244-3393.

During July, the Mudhouse shows "Slightly Imperfect," assemblages by Fats Click. 213 W. Main St. on the Downtown Mall. 984-6833.

L'étoile Restaurant displays paintings by local artists Barry Gordon and Malcolm Hughes. Gordon's abstract works feature interiors and everyday objects; Hughes portrays landscapes in the Impressionist style. 817 W. Main St. (across from the Amtrak Station). 979-7957.

During July, view "Here, There and Everywhere," watercolors, gouaches, and collages by Mary Wirth, at Art Upstairs. 316 E. Main St., above The Hardware Store, on the Downtown Mall. 923-3900.

Through August 16, The McGuffey Art Center presents its annual Summer Group Show, featuring work by renting and associate members. Check out (and buy!) painting, drawing, printmaking, fiber art, calligraphy, mixed media, stained glass, hot glass, sculpture, photography, furniture, marbling, ceramics, and book arts. Good news for McGuffey fans: The center has added an hour to its Tuesday-Saturday schedule and now keeps its doors open until 6pm. 201 Second St. NW. 295-7973.

Transient Crafters displays the glasswork of Kimberly Larkin through July. In August, the gallery features "Recent Musings in Watercolor," an exhibition of paintings by Leslie Allyn. 118 W. Main St. on the Downtown Mall. 972-9500.

Bozart Gallery presents "Sky High," watercolors and acrylics by Mercedes Lopez, during July. In August, the gallery offers a members' show. 211 W. Main St. 296-3919.

Martha Jefferson Hospital presents an exhibition of paintings by Richard Crozier and his students, entitled "Charlottesville in Paint" through September 3. 459 Locust Ave. 982-7000.

Radar

The Artisans Center of Virginia presents an exhibition of water bird decoys crafted by John Owen, during July. In addition, the center hosts its first "Artisan Members Exhibition" through September 2. 601 Shenandoah Village Drive (exit 94 off I-64), Waynesboro. 540-946-3294.

Through September 4, The Arts Center in Orange features a mixed-media installation of toy-based objects, "Spielzug/Zeitgeist," by Jennifer Van Winkle. 129 E. Main St., Orange. 540-672-7311.

Madison's Sevenoaks Pathwork Center hosts the Charlottesville-Albemarle Art Associations 11th annual "Juried Art Show" through September 25. Winners include Chris Rudasill, J.M. Henry, and Douglas Williams. 403 Pathwork Way, Madison. 434-295-2486.

Sun's Traces Gallery displays baskets by Charlotte LaRoy (featured in The Fiber Arts Design Book), as well as clay works by Paula Brown-Steedly, handmade paper by Rebecca Humphrey, and weaving by Barbara Gentry and Pat Hoover. Barboursville. 540-832-7044.

The Ed Jaffe Gallery features paintings and marble sculptures by Ed Jaffe, plus abstract photographs by Marc Jaffe. 108 W. Main St., Orange. 540-672-2400.

Staunton's Middlebrook Gallery offers contemporary art and fine crafts, including sculpture by Ken Smith. 5 Middlebrook Ave. 540-885-9955.

During the month of July local artists Peg Redd of Fork Union, Page Coplan of Glen Allen, and Paul Charlton of Scottsville display their artwork at Caffe Bocce. 330 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-4422.

Other

The Fluvanna Heritage Trail Foundation will hold its fifth annual show in October and invites artists in all media from Fluvanna and surrounding counties to submit works depicting "Trial Experience: scenes, sites, and people." Information and applications are available at Carysbrook Library and the Fluvanna Community Center in Fork Union, as well as the McGuffey Art Center. For more information, contact Martha K. Rossi, 434-589-6545 or visit fluvannaheritage.org.

Art Upstairs has published a new gallery guide mapping 22 venues in downtown Charlottesville. The brochure is available at Art Upstairs and at the other galleries listed, as well as at many hotels and restaurants.

FEATURES/FEATURES/FEATURES
ART
Size matters: Impressive big pics at UVA
By Laura Parsons art@readthehook.com

Admittedly, I'm easily irritated by language, and recently a few expressions have wormed their way into everyday usage that absolutely make me grind my teeth. "My bad." "Me likey." "24-7." (Add "365" and my urge to throttle becomes almost irresistible.) And, thanks to McDonald's– that bastion of popular culture– the word "supersize."

So when I saw the title "Super Size It: Large Photographs from the Collection" attached to an exhibition at the University of Virginia Art Museum, I rolled my eyes and developed a predisposition to dislike its contents.

I was wrong.

Although the show's nine photographs obviously share a large format presentation, the supersizing doesn't end there. The artists are supersized names in the field of contemporary photography, and the work illustrates the supersized range that art photography has come to encompass.

On one wall hangs the moody, silver gelatin print "Untitled (Manassas #1)" by Sally Mann (who was supersized as "America's Best Photographer" by Time Magazine in 2001). Using a camera purposefully outfitted with damaged and ill-fitting lenses, Mann shot the nostalgic, dark image as part of her "Mother Land" series. Pinholes of light mimic stars above a lone, silhouetted tree, while on the right a scrap of detritus on the film appears to be a bird falling onto the melancholy field.

Nearby Andres Serrano's Cibachrome "Crucifixion" presents three elongated black figures, recognizable but vague– like shadows of Giacometti figures– murky within a supersaturated liquid red. (You may recall that Serrano created a supersized controversy with his "Piss Christ" in the early 1990s.)

Going beyond the photograph itself to create the image in "Club Allegro Fortissimo, Paris," William Klein blows up a horizontal snippet of b&w frames of seven supersized women languorously posed at a Turkish bath. He then paints the strip and its white background with brushstrokes of blue, red, and black to create an abstract work several times removed from the photograph he originally shot.

"Super Size It" is exceptionally well organized, with each image relating in some way to the next. Vertical elements run through the photographs on the west wall, and strong colors pull together the images in the room's center.

Word to the wise: Skip Andrea Douglas' accompanying grad-school-like essay, choked with supersized postmodern jargon. It obscures rather than illuminates the photographs.

Douglas's self-conscious essay aside, my overall response to "Super Size It" is me likey. (Ow! I think I bit my tongue.)

"Super Size It: Large Photographs from the Collection" is on view at the University of Virginia Art Museum through August 8 (take note: the closure date is 10 days earlier than previously publicized). 155 Rugby Road. 924-3592.

WORDS
Minor key Dixie: New Southern writers voice dissent
By SUSAN TYLER HITCHCOCK WORDS@READTHEHOOK.COM

The pace is picking up for political publishing as we round the bend into this election autumn. Not to be outdone by the media moguls of the Northeast, NewSouth Books, located in Montgomery, Alabama, has issued a fine book representing the voices of Southern social activists, who rail against the present administration, bemoan the priorities that drive the nation, and reach back into their own rich past, personal and collective, to offer a vision of a more just, peaceful, and thoughtful nation.

The book is a collection of essays by some of the South's most well-respected historians, legal theoreticians, political philosophers, and authors, and includes an essay by Charlottesville's own Paul Gaston, a history professor who holds a place of honor in our own integration history. Gaston will speak on behalf of Where We Stand: Voices of Southern Dissent at New Dominion Bookshop on Wednesday, August 4, at noon.

Gaston is one of 12– 13 if you count Jimmy Carter, who contributes a foreword to the book– whose voices ring out from these pages, some measured, some strident, all deeply concerned. Gaston writes of Fairhope, Alabama, the utopian community founded by his grandfather and led by his father– a lovely town of "cooperative individualism" that offered itself to the region and the nation as an example of what American dreams could bring. Sadly, observes Gaston, even Fairhope has morphed into an upwardly mobile, materialistic, corporate-driven subdivision, many of whose residents are not even aware of the idealism that founded the town.

Daniel Pollitt, emeritus law professor at UNC, lists the ways the Constitution has recently been "battered," tracing most assaults to the Patriot Act. Susan Ford Wiltshire, a classicist from Texas teaching in Nashville, pulls wisdom from the classics, the Bible, and modern poetry to unveil the foundation principles of those in power.

The ACLU's Laughlin McDonald argues that voting disparity in our country makes us poorly equipped to export democracy to other nations. Janisse Ray, author and ecologist, draws wisdom from hummingbirds, monarch butterflies, and Wendell Berry, mourning the way global capitalism threatens the natural world.

All these writers, notes the book's editor, Anthony Dunbar, represent the South, which "has contributed disproportionately to the promise for good in our society but also to its sad misdirection." One hopes, reading these essays and sensing the passion and principles they share, that this South will rise again come November 2.

Paul Gaston will discuss Where We Stand: Voices of Southern Dissent and read from his essay at New Dominion Bookshop on Wednesday, August 4, at noon. 404 E. Main St., 295-2552.

FAMILY
Kids Day: Fun for parents and progeny
BY LINDA KOBERT FAMILY@READTHEHOOK.COM

On Mother's Day, my boys were suitably solicitous. They gave me little gifts and cards they'd made themselves, and they took me out for brunch. When he finished munching, my younger son wiped his mouth with his napkin, propped his elbows on the table, and eagerly leaned toward me saying, "So! When is Kid's Day, Mom?"

Now, instead of the soporific reply, "Everyday is Kid's Day, dear," I can tell them straight: National Kids Day is the first Sunday in August.

Led by the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, a leading provider of youth services in the country, and KidsPeace, an organization dedicated to helping children cope with life crises, National Kids Day has been created as a celebration of all children that encourages families to get out and do something fun together.

"We honor kids through the gift of meaningful time," said Tim Sinatra, executive director of the Boys and Girls Club of Charlottesville/Albemarle, which is sponsoring an afternoon of quality time for local families.

Fun and games are the order of the day at this event taking place at the Cherry Avenue Club and on the playing fields at near-by Buford Middle School. When was the last time you tried to run a sack race or make a hula hoop rock? And what's more fun than tossing a Frisbee or getting your face painted? There will be penny carnival games including ring toss, bean bag toss, and go fish. The Boy Scouts will be on hand offering the chance to brush up on your archery skills.

Other community service organizations are expected to bring additional fun along with information about local services for youth and families. And of course there will be food.

Over in Richmond, the Children's Museum there is also celebrating this new holiday. Lambeth Petting Zoo brings their ponies to the museum's Learning Garden to offer rides for kids from noon to 4pm. Hanover Concert Band performs at 2pm. Ice cream will be served all afternoon.

There's no reason to limit the "meaningful time" families spend together to one afternoon, though. Other fairs, festivals, fun, and games are happening all the time all around town. Keep an eye on the Hook calendar pages, or check out the National Kids Day website (kidsday.net) for more ideas to really make every day Kids Day.

National Kids Day Family Picnic takes place Sunday, August 1, at the Cherry Avenue Boys and Girls Club from 1-4pm. All ages welcome. Free. 1000 Cherry Ave. next to the Smith Pool at Buford Middle School. 977-3514. The Children's Museum of Richmond is open from noon-5pm on Sunday. Kids Day activities are included with museum admission. 2626 W. Broad St. 804-474-7031. c-mor.org.

WALKABOUT
I
n the park: African-American community gala
By TIM SPRINKLE WALKABOUT@READTHEHOOK.COM
Community festivals are all about bringing people together; but it's rare to find one that reaches out to include not only the immediate community, but a large part of the state as well.

But that's exactly what's happened with the Charlottesville African-American Cultural Arts Festival since its start way back in 1989. Although it was established by a group of interested local citizens, the festival has grown into a regional celebration of African-American culture, art, and food attended by hundreds of Virginians every year.

"We got started as a way to keep the community at large, and especially the young people, in touch with our heritage," says committee spokesperson Angela Estes. "It's a chance for everyone to benefit from the education, experiences, and culture of those who came before us."

These days, the festival encompasses more than four days of activities and events ranging from a "Jazz Night" scholarship fundraiser (held in the week preceding the main festival weekend), to the traditional African opening ceremony, to the community BBQ picnic. It's a family-friendly event that, organizers say, offers a little something for everyone.

This weekend's festivities kick off on Thursday evening with the Presence Theater production of "Now Let Me Fly," a play commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. the Board of Education ruling that ended institutionalized segregation in this country. Then, without even leaving the building, participants can sample a wide variety of authentic African cuisine at the "A Taste of Ghana" dinner. Best of all, both events are free.

The festivities move over to Booker T. Washington Park on Saturday for the 15th annual "traditional cultural arts festival" with storytellers, food vendors, a SpiritWalker, drumming demonstration, African Village shopping, gospel music, and more. On Sunday, the space is reserved for the annual community picnic: BBQ, an array of traditional Virginia favorites, and readings in memory of longtime festival participant, Jeannette Caines. (Caines, a celebrated local author, storyteller, and Charlottesville institution, passed away in early July.)

"Our theme this year is Celebrating Our Heritage," Estes explains, "so everything we have planned is in tribute to what our ancestors achieved and endured to get us where we are today. That said, it's also a free, fun activity for the whole family. Bring a blanket, enjoy the cool shade of a tree, and have a good time."

All Festival events are free and open to everyone. The "Taste of Ghana Dinner" and "Now Let Me Fly" performance happen at Burley Middle School on Rose Hill Drive Thursday, July 29, starting at 6:30pm. The weekend events will be held at Washington Park, on the corner of 10th Street NW and Preston Avenue, west of the Downtown Mall. All festival events will be held rain or shine. For additional information and a complete schedule, visit cvilleafrican-amfest.com or call 979-0582.

PERFORMANCE
Al fresco fun: Catch the Barber and the Bard
BY ROBERT ARMENGOL PERFORMANCE@READTHEHOOK.COM

Ah, summer. There's no better time to blow off whatever commitments you had and spend a little time outside on a cool (or even not so cool) evening. Now if it would just stop raining every night…

Two of the area's most charming outdoor venues are offering theatergoers a pair of classic comedies. One is Shakespeare's hilarious romp through the gardens of the Italian Renaissance, a story of amore, deceit, and a whole lot of hullabaloo over mere trifles– Much Ado About Nothing.

The other is a Rossini opera whose most memorable tune was popularized by that wascally wabbit, Bugs Bunny.

When Bugs sings "Figaro, Figaro, Figaro!" to the befuddlement of Elmer Fudd, he's playing The Barber of Seville, which you can now see performed by real people on stage at Ash Lawn-Highland, the country home of President James Monroe.

The Ash Lawn Opera Festival brings young talent from around the country for performances aimed at connoisseurs as well as average Joes. All the operas are sung in English without amplification, so there are reasons for both purists and novices to rejoice. Best of all may be the setting– amid "Monroe's ancient ash trees and towering boxwoods," as the playbill proclaims.

Figaro, by the way, is the name of the barber, a jack-of-all-trades really, who makes up for his nosiness with good humor. "Money talks," the folks at Ash Lawn say, "but true love triumphs in this timeless comic masterpiece."

Look for similar themes in Much Ado, playing at the ruins of Governor Barbour's mansion, now site of the present-day Barboursville Vineyards. Also a yearly event, Shakespeare at the Ruins is a production of Four County Players, who stage shows over four weekends in all, two of which are yet to come.

Sip on local wine, bring a picnic, watch the show at twilight. I had plans to go myself until my wife delivered our baby last weekend. Yikes! Well, even if I can't speak of this particular performance with firsthand knowledge, I can say it would take a flock of dodos to screw up the bard's script– it's that good.

In Much Ado, directed in this performance by UVA's Gil Gonzalez, the feisty Beatrice and Benedict have at it in a war of wits that hardly masks their obvious infatuation with each other. Toss in the fruitless exploits of the villainous Don John, the confused constable Dogberry and the wise Friar Francis, and you have arguably the most original slapstick in the English language.

Add a little wine, and all should be right with the world.

Shakespeare at the Ruins runs every weekend through August 15. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 8pm, with gates opening at 6:30. Gates open 5pm Sundays for a 6:30 showing. Visitors are encouraged to arrive early and stroll the vineyards. Feel free to bring picnics and coolers. No alcohol except that purchased at the vineyard. Routes 33 and 20 in Barboursville. $12-18; $15 for a gourmet box supper (by reservation). 540-832-5355.

Doors also open for picnicking for The Barber of Seville two hours in advance. All shows at 8pm: July 30 and Aug. 1, 4, 6, 8, 11, 13 and 15. Route 795. $15-24. 293-4500.

TUNES
Horror movie: The Brides push your buttons
BY MARK GRABOWSKI TUNES@READTHEHOOK.COM
The Dawning is back, with a blood-thirsty hunger for bloody hemoglobin to feed its immortal flames! Yeah! Totally!

The Dawning, the Saturday night institution devoted to children of the night, lovers of Bauhaus, and the many shades of black, recently arose from its ashes after losing its weekly slot at Tokyo Rose. Though the history of the Rose and the Dawning spanned almost six years, security issues led owner Atsushi Miura to restrict his bookers to no punk or goth bands a few months ago– the death knell for the Dawning, at least at that particular venue. The Outback Lodge quickly picked up the slack, and began booking our town's darker bands. The offer led to The Dawning's rise from the dead.

On Saturday, July 31, the Lodge hosts The Dawning featuring local dark rockers No Gods No Monsters opening for horror movie stars of the past and NYC band The Brides, and there would be a lot of "raise the roof" hand gestures, if the audience were really that lame.

Started in 2001 by the appropriately titled guitarist/bassist/singer Corey Gorey and drummer D.W. Friend, the band– including guitarist/bassist/signer Gregjaw and keyboardist Julia Ghoulia– started their trip into the exciting world of commercial musicianship with a European-only, four-song promo CD that accompanied the group on their first tour of the continent.

In 2002, an eight-song EP entitled If You Dance was released by the group, quickly followed up by the Baby Girls are Much More Tender EP. Here Come the Brides- Part I and Part II were also released in 2002, and after signing with Hell's Hundred Records, the group is now at work on an upcoming full-length.

"Pin-Up Doll" from Here Comes the Brides- Part II is a riff- and organ-laden schizophrenic tale of being led by a cat named "Locustwood Boulevard" who instructs the song's narrator to "Get the glamour girl," and do things to her.

What things? you may ask. Well, the song's chorus goes "An object of affection - all mine / A beautiful dissection - all mine," so you make up your own mind. It's catchy, and though the ominous tone of the narrator/singer is "spooky," the song is just smart pop music.

"Wicked Moth" from No Gods No Monsters' soon-to-be-released EP is actually a very absorbing track. Bowie combined with an '80s operatic vocalist (Geddy Lee, I'm looking in your direction) describes the group's singer, Bob Davidson, to a T, and on this track, Hal Brigish's guitar produces a heavy '70s rock sound. The number's best moment comes a little more than half way through, when "All right, pipe down, boys" leads to the guitar taking a breather, and bass, drums, and an emotive "Do you want to get out of here?" become the center of attention.

Dead, living, whatever– No Gods No Monsters and The Brides have the sounds to get you to your feet.

The Dawning presents The Brides, with No Gods No Monsters at the Outback Lodge, July 31. $6, 10pm.