Cultural calendar, May 13-20, 2004

THURSDAY, May 13
FAMILY
Fair Play:
The scientists at JP Burley Middle School will be demonstrating just how much fun science can be at a school science fair. Lots of hands-on activities for kids of all ages let participants learn as they play. 6-7:30pm. Free. Rose Hill Drive. 295-5101, ext. 209.

Kids Day Out: Mommy & Me (and Daddy too) hosts a post-Mother's Day celebration at Barracks Road Shopping Center. This month's kid-friendly activities focus on marvelous moms. 10am-noon. Free. Barracks Road. 977-4583.

Tales for Tots: The five-and-under crowd can celebrate birthdays at Barnes & Noble's preschool story time where the book list includes Clifford's Birthday Party by Norman Bidwell and The Flower Garden by Eve Bunting. 10:30am. Free. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-6598.

Great Expectations: Expectant parents and others can take a journey through the process of pregnancy and childbirth with a series of childbirth classes and video presentations by Midwifery Options for Mothers. Tonight's program is titled "Born in the USA" and takes place at Central Library. 6:30-8:30pm. Free. 201 E. Market St. 978-4779. See Family feature.

PERFORMANCE
Swing Swap:
The Charlottesville Swing Dance Society hosts this weekly Thursday-night swing dancing session, with an hour of East Coast Swing, an hour of West Coast Swing, and a DJ taking requests. Singles and couples welcome, no partner needed. 7-9pm. Albemarle County Office Building Auditorium, 401 McIntire Road. Free. 980-2744.

Firehouse Cabaret: Richmond's Firehouse Theatre Project explores the many sides of male/female relationships in a traditional cabaret format of song and dance punctuated by a series of 10-minute plays. 8pm. Runs through May 16. 1609 W. Broad St., Richmond. $20, reservations recommended. 804-405-5685.

Teen Acting Studio: This weekly workshop will focus on opening up the text within a Shakespearean monologue through extensive language work: scanning the verse, exploring rhythm and sound, and working the breath. Students need to bring 3 sample Shakespearean monologues with them to the first class. Pre-requisite: Prior LATTE acting studio experience or instructor permission. Runs until June 3. 5-7pm. $60 members, $75 general. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177.

Turn On, Tune In: Live Arts' Lattehouse presents its sixth annual show, Frequency, in which local teens spoof popular music and the role it plays in our culture. Runs through May 22. $7. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177x108.

Mountain Heart: Staunton's award-winning bluegrass band makes its area debut. 7:30pm. Blackfriars Playhouse, 10 S. Market St., Staunton. $20. 540-851-1733.

A Sort of Explanation: Prospect Dance Group presents a new evening-length work for dance, music, video, and text. Closes May 22. 8pm. McGuffey Art Center, 201 Second St. NW. $12. 409-6056. See Performance feature.

TUNES
Two Red Shoes at Dew Drop Inn:
TRS sound like Huey Lewis and the News fronted by a Woman. Sort-of. Original blues and blues-heavy pop songs from locals. No cover, 8:30pm.

Jim Waive (country-folk) at the Blue Moon Diner. Free, 8pm (W)

Mountain Heart (bluegrass) at Blackfriars Playhouse. $20, 7:30pm.

Karaoke Night with DJ Wild Wes at Buffalo Wild Wings. Free, 9pm (W)

Chicken Head Blues Band at Dürty Nelly's. $4, 9pm. (W)

Thompson/ D'earth and friends (freeform jazz) at Miller's. $4, 10pm. (W)

Candlewyck at Gravity Lounge. $5, 8:30pm.

The Zing Kings outside on the Downtown Mall and at the Charlottesville City Market. Free, 11am.

Elderly and Riot Act at Outback Lodge. $3, 10pm.

Karaoke at Pompeii Lounge in Staunton. No cover, 9pm.

Robert Jospé (jazz) at Rapture. No cover, 7:30pm. (W)

Satisfaction (dance party) at Rapture. No cover, 10:30pm. (W)

Middle Eastern Belly Dance Class at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 6:30pm. (W)

Hogwaller Ramblers (bluegrass mayhem) at Shebeen. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Kait and Thom (modern jazz duo) at Tokyo Rose upstairs. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Robbie Collins and Company at Twisted Branch Tea Bazaar. No cover, 9pm.

Tim Trotter (guitar/vocals) (noon-2pm) and Andrew McAteer (banjo) (5-7pm) at Veggie Heaven Café. No cover. (W)

FRIDAY, May 14
FAMILY
Storybook Dance:
Young thespians ages 2-5 can climb on stage at the Virginia Discovery Museum as they sing and dance and bring to life the story of The Little Mermaid. Come in costume if you like. 10:30-11:10am and 11:15-11:55. Included in the price of admission. East end of the Downtown Mall. 977-1025.

Party Time: Albemarle County and Charlottesville Social Services host Community Fun Day to highlight services provided by these agencies for low-income families. Pepsi, popcorn, candy, face painting, balloons, door prizes, and more. 1-4pm. Free. Albemarle County Office Building, 401 McIntire Road.

Dying2Drive: The Virginia Science Museum hosts the first and only state-wide driver safety initiative targeting teens. Today's forum features speakers, a 30-second PSA, and Q&A. Refreshments will be served. 10-11am. Free. 2500 Broad St. in Richmond. 703-791-7354. 301-498-6656.

WALKABOUT
Fridays after 5:
The popular outdoor concert series is back for its 16th season. This week's act:The Key West Band.

No Crying in Softball: A League of Our Own, a softball program for disabled teens and adults, holds the season-opening game at McIntire Park. No fee. 7-9pm. For info, call Charlottesville Therapeutic Recreation at 970-3264.

Wildflower Symposium: It sounds like a business retreat, but it's actually three days of guided nature hikes, workshops, and seminars on topics ranging from native gardening to nature photography sponsored by the Wintergreen Nature Foundation. 9am-5:30pm. $115 for all three days. Pre-registration required for some events. Call the foundation at 325-8169.

WORDS
Cruisin' the Campaign:
Washington Post writer Ceci Connolly gives the inside-the-Beltway perspective of Decision 2004. Miller Center, 11am. 2201 Old Ivy Road. 924-0921.

PERFORMANCE
No Shame Theatre: Up for a theatrical nightcap? Join performers at this alternative venue for original material by anyone about anything. The first 15 people who show up get a spot on stage. Or you can just watch the carryings on. Guidelines can be found under "How to No Shame" at noshame.org/charlottesville/. 11pm. Live Arts Up Stage Theater, 123 E. Water St. $5. 977-4177.

Firehouse Cabaret:See Thursday, May 13.

Turn On, Tune In: See Thursday, May 13. Tonight's show is at 8pm.

Bach's Lunch: Christ Church presents the Blue Hill Chamber Ensemble in a free lunchtime concert. Noon. Christ Episcopal Church, l 120 W. High St. Free, box lunches at the door for $5. 293-2347.

The Music Man: Four County Players presents the beloved musical by Meredith Willson. "County fair" with food and beverages one hour before the show. 8pm. Runs until May 23. Barboursville Community Center, Route 678 between Routes 33 and 20, Barboursville. $10-14. 540-832-5355.

Two Gentlemen of Verona: Shenandoah Shakespeare presents a new production of the Bard's early comedy in the magnificent Blackfriars Theater. 7:30pm. 10 S. Market St., Staunton. $10-26. 540-885-5588.

TUNES
Cheick Hamala Diabate and Mamadou Diabate at the Prism:
Mali musicians performing on traditional stringed instruments the koni and the kora. $18/$15 advance, 8pm.

Go Machine and the Teeth at Twisted Branch Tea Bazaar: Go Machine sound like the product of their influences - Coldplay, Postal Service, and Itzhak Perlman (for the violin parts). No cover, 9pm. See Tunes feature.

Back in the Day (old school dance party celebrating UVA graduation) at Garden of Sheba. $7, 10:30pm.

Charlotte Hisey (singer/songwriter) 1-3pm at Veggie Heaven café. No cover. (W)

Big John McCaughan at Veggie Heaven Café, 6-8pm, and then at Coup de Ville, 10:30pm-1am. No cover.

Calf Mountain Jam at Clock Tower Tavern in Staunton. No cover, 9pm.

Two Red Shoes at the Dew Drop Inn. No cover, 7:30pm.

Tom Proutt (bluegrass) and John Rimel at Gravity Lounge. $5, 8:30pm.

Vernon Fisher ("romantic side of jazz") at Keswick Hall. No cover, 6:30pm. (W)

Josh Mayo Band (acoustic pop)at Orbit. No cover, 10:30pm.

Navel and Gold Mind Squad at Outback Lodge. $6, 10pm.

Jerirah Prophett Band at Pompeii Lounge in Staunton. No cover, 9pm.

DJ Almighty (Kiss FM's hip hop DJ) at Rapture. $8, 10pm.

Open Mic Night at Rapunzel's. No cover, 7;30pm signup.

Max Collins (otherwordly guitar) at Shebeen. No cover, 11pm. (W)

SATURDAY, May 15
WORDS
|Con Law:
UVA's Michael Klarman is the authoritative author on constitutional law and the civil rights movement. He reads from his new history, From Jim Crow to Civil Rights, at Barnes & Noble at 2pm. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-0466. See Words feature.

WALKABOUT
Nelson Home Tour:
Wander through eight historic homes and churches on the 16th annual Nelson County Historical Society home tour. Guides provide historical information at each site. $15 fee. 263-5632.

Wildflower Symposium: Second day of Wintergreen's popular event. Today's hours are 7am-8:30pm. See Friday, May 14, for details. Call the foundation at 325-8169 for information and to register.

Watch Those Streams: Learn how to gauge the health of a stream with the pros at Streamwatch at their Volunteer Stream Monitoring Workshop. No fee, but class size is limited. 10am-4pm. Ivy Creek Natural Area. For info or to reserve a space, call 242-1145 or visit streamwatch.org.

Virginia Wine Festival: Food and wine author Hilde Lee is the featured guest at the 10th Annual Virginia Wine Festival. She will discuss Virginia's growing wine industry; give tips for pairing food with wine; and sign copies of her book, Virginia Wine Country III. Enjoy gourmet food, tour James Monroe's home, and taste wines from across the state. The festival runs from 11am-5pm all weekend. Lee speaks 1-4pm Saturday. $10 fee ($15 in advance). Ash Lawn-Highland. For more info, call 293-9539 or visit ashlawnhighland.org.

Plant Walk: Stroll up and down the Saunders-Monticello Trail with an experienced nature guide and learn about the native trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants found in the Piedmont forest around Jefferson's Monticello. 9:30am. $10 fee, registration required. 984-9822.

Plantation Community Weekend: Step back in time and experience 19th century Mulberry Row, the center of African-American life at Monticello. 10am-5pm, Saturday and Sunday. Fee included in price of general admission. 984-9822.

Spring Wildflower Walk: Explore the spring blossoms at the Ivy Creek Natural Area with Mary Lee Epps of the Virginia Native Plant Society. No Fee. 9am, meet at the Ivy Creek barn. 973-7772.

Lamp Bead-Making: Studio Baboo guest instructor Lisa St. Martin offers a class on lampwork bead making. The two-day course is from 10am-4pm Saturday and Sunday. $210 fee includes glass, use of torch, mandrels, and tools ($195 intermediate fee for use of torch only). 106 Fifth St. Downtown Mall. 244-2905.

WALKABOUT AND FAMILY
Be There or Be Square:
Batesville Day returns for its 27th year, with food, entertainment, and fun for the whole family. Start your day with the classic and challenging Batesville 10K race (registrations accepted up to race time at 8am), or sign up for the eclectic Batesville Day Parade and strut your stuff! Afterwards, retire to the aptly named Batesville Day Field for live music, food, kids games, and more. Plank Road (Rt. 692) and Page's Field in Batesville. 823-5693. See Walkabout feature.

Edible Complex: The Living Earth School awakens hungry foragers to the wild feast surrounding us. This workshop points out plants that are tasty and safe to eat and offers tips on how to incorporate wild edibles into mouth-watering gourmet meals. 9am-5pm. $65. Pre-registration required. 258 Rocky Bottom Lane, Afton. 540-456-7339. circleofseeds.com.

PERFORMANCE
Live Arts Actor's LAB:
Join acting coach and director Carol Pedersen to sharpen your acting tools and gear up for numerous summer acting possibilities now. New session runs until 6/19. Weekly drop-in session 10-11am, full session 10-1pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. $10 drop-in rate; $160 for full eight-week session. 977-4177x100.

A Day with Judi Dench: The great Dame appears in Staunton for a tribute to her late husband, actor Michael Williams, and a fund-raiser for Shenandoah Shakespeare's S2. 1pm. Blackfriars Theater, 10 S. Market St., Staunton. Call for prices and reservations. 540-885-5588 x16.

The Importance of Being Earnest: Shenandoah Shakespeare presents a new production of Oscar Wilde's comic masterpiece in the magnificent Blackfriars Theater. 10 S. Market St., Staunton. $10-26. 540-885-5588.

Two Gentlemen of Verona: See Friday, May 14.

Virginia Glee Club: Frank Albinder leads the University's oldest musical ensemble in a night of male choral works. 9:30pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA Central Grounds. $5-10. 924-3984.

Swing Dance: The Charlottesville Swing Dance Society offers an evening of Swing Dancing and a variety of other dances with music from TomSound Productions. Singles welcome. A free beginner Cha-Cha lesson is included with admission from 7-8pm. Dance 8-11pm. Municipal Arts Center, 1119 5th St. Extended. $6-12. 980-2744.

Latin Groove: Studio 206 Belmont presents a new weekly class. Learn salsa, samba, merengue, and other Latin forms of dance in an exercise setting. Dress comfortably for a great workout. 11:15am. Studio 206 Belmont, 505 Monticello Road. $12 drop-in; 5-class card for $45. 973-2065.

Shakespeare Saturdays: Here's your chance to play Falstaff, one of Shakespeare's most beloved characters, from Henry IV, Part I. For any adult with a love of Shakespeare or an itch to get on stage. Ages 18 and up. 10am-noon. Blackfriars Theater, 10 S. Market St., Staunton. $15. 540-885-5588.

A Sort of Explanation: See Thursday, May 13, and Performance feature.

Firehouse Cabaret: See Friday, April 14.

The Music Man: See Friday, May 14.

Turn On, Tune In: See Thursday, May 13.

FAMILY
Aviation Adventure:
High fliers can find out all about helicopters at the Virginia Aviation Museum. Lots of hands-on and a look at the real thing. 10 am-noon. Included in the price of admission. Richmond International Airport. 804-236-3622. vam.smv.org.

Brush Up on Birds: Families can get the basics of bird watching at the Frontier Culture Museum today. Naturalists take visitors on a one- to two-mile walk on museum grounds including woods, brush, and the new wetland pond. Binoculars provided. Meet at the Visitor Center. 7-10am. $5 adults, $3 kids. Reservations required. Rt. 250 west in Staunton. 540-332-7850, ext. 165.

FAMILY AND TUNES
Tunes from Down Under:
Jim Gagnon presents a performance and workshop with the didgeridoo at the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Museum. This magical, meditative music has been played by the Aboriginal peoples of Australia for 50,000 years and is easy to learn, Gagnon says. Instruction for beginners to advanced players. Instruments provided. Peter Jefferson Place. 760-1314.

TUNES
John Renbourn and Jacqui McShee at the Prism:
The guitarist and founding vocalist for the British folk-rock group reunite at the Prism, for the conclusion of WTJU (91.1)'s week-long folk marathon. $20/$16 advance, 8pm.

Jan Smith Band at Rapunzel's: Jan Smith and the rest of her traveling show grace the stage at Rapunzel's once again with that home-cooked rootsy-pop we all know and love. $5. 7:30pm.

Victor Cabas (blues) at Basic Necessities. No cover, 6:30pm. (W)

Monticello Road (rootsy rock) at Clock Tower Tavern in Staunton. No cover, 9pm.

Populist Dancing at Club Rio. $10, 9pm. (W)

Don Morrisroe at the Dew Drop Inn. No cover, 7:30pm.

Kevn Kinney with David Sickmen at Gravity Lounge. $15/$12 advance, 8pm.

Southside Funk Brothers at Orbit. No cover, 10pm.

Fletcher Bridge at Outback Lodge. $6, 10pm.

Mark & Brian at Pompeii Lounge. No cover, 9pm.

SEXXY: Poetry Slam with The 5th L at Rapture. No cover, 7pm.

Funky Fetish & Lingerie Party with After Dark, DJ Izm, and the Bucktoof DJz at Rapture. $5/Free for the "under"-dressed, 10pm.

Fair Weather Bums (bluegrass) at Shebeen. No cover, 11pm. (W)

Tackle Squad (DJs!) at Twisted Branch Tea Bazaar. No cover, 9pm.

Jim Davies at Veggie Heaven café. No cover, noon-2pm. (W)

Johnstone Reggae Band at Garden of Sheba. $5, 10pm.

SUNDAY, May 16
WALKABOUT
Montpelier Gardens:
Tour the renovated landscape arboretum and the two-acre Annie Rogers duPont formal garden at James Madison's former home. For times and more info, 540-672-2728 or montpelier.org.

WALKABOUT AND FAMILY
Butterflies:
Local insect expert Mike Scott leads the first butterfly walk of the year at the Ivy Creek Natural Area. Meet in the Education Building to see Scott's display of the butterflies of Ivy Creek and for an introduction to identification skills. No fee. 1pm. 973-7772.

FAMILY
Moving Heaven and Earth:
It's your last chance to feel the motion at the Virginia Discovery Museum where the Back Gallery exhibit Patterns, Cycles, and Change will be moving on. The earth and its movement are the subjects of this room with a view, and kids can move the planets, create a rainstorm, and journey through the seasons. Included with museum admission. East end of the Downtown Mall. 977-1025.

PERFORMANCE
Sunday Salsa:
The Charlottesville Salsa Club sponsors a weekly opportunity to learn and practice Salsa and other dances, in a smoke-free nightclub atmosphere. A basic lesson (usually salsa) gets the evening started at 8. DJ'd music is 80 percent salsa mixed with other Latin styles. Complimentary water and sodas. The Outback Lodge, 917 Preston Ave. 8pm-12am. $5 (members $3). 979-7211. cvillesalsaclub.com.

Henry IV, Part I: Shenandoah Shakespeare presents a new production of the Bard's best-loved history play in the magnificent Blackfriars Theater. 2pm. 10 S. Market St., Staunton. $10-26. 540-885-5588.

Firehouse Cabaret: See Friday, May 14. Today's show is at 4pm.

Turn On, Tune In: See Thursday, May 13. Today's show is a matinee at 2pm.

Turn of the Screw: The Sideshow Opera presents Benjamin Britten's chamber opera The Turn of the Screw, based on the novella by Henry James. Jefferson Theater, Downtown Mall, $7-25. 245-9377.

The Music Man: See Friday, May 14. Today's show is at 2:30pm.

TUNES
Peter Tork & James Lee Stanley with Aura3 at Gravity Lounge:
The "deep" Monkey, right here in Our Town? What has he been doing with himself? $15, 8pm.

Movie Night: The Graduate and Harold and Maude at Rapture: Young men losing their innocence to older women– in one case, a much older woman– seem to be the theme for this week's movie night. No cover, 8pm.

The Hogwaller Ramblers (bluegrass mayhem) at Escafé. No cover, 10pm. (W)

B.C. at Miller's. No cover, 10:30pm. (W)

Irish Music Session at Shebeen. No cover, 3-6pm. (W)

MONDAY, May 17
WALKABOUT
Charity Golf: Charity Golf:
Play golf on a weekday, and raise money for a good cause in the process. The 12th annual Little Keswick Day for Special Children tournament takes place at the Keswick Club to raise money for special education awareness and for scholarships at Little Keswick School. 12:30 start. The $165 per golfer fee includes a buffet lunch, reception, and a souvenir golf shirt. For info, or to get entry forms, call Marc Columbus at the Little Keswick Found Foundation for Special Education, 296-9793.

WORDS
Medicare:
Gail Wilensky of Project HOPE analyzes the winners and losers of the new Medicare bill. Miller Center, 11am. 2201 Old Ivy Road. 924-0921.

TUNES
Open Mic Night with Charles Davis at Baja Bean. No cover, signup 8:30pm/9pm. (W)

Jackson Gibson at Coupe DeVille's. No cover, 10:30pm. (W)

George Melvin (piano merriment) at South Street Brewery. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Travis Elliot (pop) and John Figura at the Virginian. No cover, 10pm. (W)

TUESDAY, May 18
PERFORMANCE
Turn of the Scre:
See Sunday, May 16.

TUNES
Adam Cuchta (keyboard) at Veggie Heaven café. No cover, 5-7pm. (W)

Karaoke Night (what you make of it) at Baja Bean. Free, 8pm. (W)

Jamie and Rolland (partial bluegrass mayhem) at the Blue Moon Diner. No cover, 8pm. (W)

Singer Songwriter night: John Rimmel at Clock Tower Tavern in Staunton. No cover, 9pm.

Glen Mack at Coupe DeVille's. No cover, 10:30pm. (W)

Craig Honeycutt with Mike Meadows at Gravity Lounge. $8, 8pm.

SNUG (funk improv) at Michael's Bistro. $3, 10pm. (W)

WEDNESDAY, May 19
PERFORMANCE
Country Dance Night:
Couples and line dancing at Fry's Spring Beach Club. Dance lesson free with cover. Lesson 7pm, dancing 8-11pm. 2512 Jefferson Park Ave. $7 cover, $4 full-time students; students $2 every fourth Wednesday through May. 977-0491.

Salsa Night: Whether you're mastering the basic step or working on learning some cool new moves, this class will help you reach your next level. No partner necessary. 8-9:30 salsa partnering lesson; 9:30-10 practice. Lesson and practice, $8, $6 students. Berkmar Ballroom, 652 W. Rio Road. 975-4611 or berkmarballroom.com.

The Importance of Being Earnest: See Saturday, May 14. Today's show is an early-bird 10:30am special.

Two Gentlemen of Verona: See Friday, May 14. Today's show is a signed performance at 2pm, pay what you will.

Teen Acting Studio: Designed for the serious teen actor, this weekly workshop will focus on actor's vocal production and physical movement, skills that will then be put to practical use in work with monologues. Students should bring 3 sample contemporary monologues with them to the first class. Runs until 6/2. 5:30-7pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. $60 members, $75 general. 977-4177.

Turn On: Tune In: See Thursday, May 13. Tonight's show is at 8pm.

WORDS
Belly Politics:
UVA's Robert Fatton discusses Haiti's situation in a lecture entitled "Of Bayonets and Constitutions." Miller Center, 2201 Old Ivy Road. 11am. 924-0921.

Too Cool for School: Sam Kashner of "Jack Kerouac School" fame reads from his memoir When I was Cool. Barnes & Noble, Barracks Road Shopping Center, 7pm. 984-0466.

Commemorating Brown: Last day to purchase tickets for a dinner reception at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities' two-day symposium on Brown and massive resistance. Congressman Bobby Scott delivers the keynote address at Monticello Event and Conference Center, 7pm. Dinner and program tickets ($40) must be purchased by May 19 from VFH. 924-3296.

Sexual Violence: The sexual assault resource agency (SARA) begins volunteer training for hotline and ER support. 295-7273, x22.

WALKABOUT
Personal Finance:
Learn to make your money work for you. The financial firm of Fulton and Lingle will teach a variety of tips and techniques at Cashflow 101, an introductory course in accounting, personal finance, and investing. No fee. 6-9pm. Fulton and Lingle offices, 1112 East High Street, Suite A. For info, call 977-1683 or visit dkadvisors.com.

TUNES
Andrew McAteer (banjo) at Veggie Heaven café. No cover, noon-2pm.

Kathy Compton at the Blue Moon Diner. No cover, 8pm. (W)

Left Foot Braking at the Bistro. $3, 10pm.

Cheesy Trivia with M&M Express at Buffalo Wild Wings. No cover, 8:30pm. (W)

Open Mic Night at Dew Drop Inn. No cover, 7;30pm. (W)

EMT (Stratton Salidis and others) at Twisted Branch Tea Bazaar. No cover, 9pm.

The Mike Rosensky Jeff Decker Quartet (jazz) at Miller's. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Mammie featuring Michael Mulvaney at Orbit. No cover, 10pm.

Jamal Millner and Friends at Ouback Lodge. Free, 10pm.

Open Jam at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 7pm. (W)

Middle Eastern Belly Dance Class at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 6:30pm. (W)

The New Republic at South Street Brewery. No cover, 10:30pm.

Kathy Olsen Trio (jazz) upstairs at Tokyo Rose. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Jim Davies (acoustic rock and blues) at the Virginian. No cover, 10pm. (W)

THURSDAY, May 20
FAMILY
More Expectations:
Expectant parents and others can take a journey through the process of pregnancy and childbirth with a series of childbirth classes and video presentations by Midwifery Options for Mothers. Tonight's program is titled "Special Delivery" and takes place at Central Library. 6:30-8:30pm. Free. 201 E. Market St. 978-4779. See Family feature.

PERFORMANCE
Swing Swap:
The Charlottesville Swing Dance Society hosts this weekly evening of swing dancing. The first hour focuses on East Coast Swing and the second hour on West Coast Swing, but the DJ takes requests. Singles and couples welcome, no partner needed. 7-9pm. Albemarle County Office Building Auditorium, 401 McIntire Road. Free. 980-2744.

Henry IV, Part I: See Sunday, May 16. Today's show is at 7:30pm.

A Sort of Explanation: See Thursday, May 13, and Performance feature, page 35.

Turn On, Tune In: See Thursday, May 13.

TUNES
Easy Star All Stars with Tru Mystic at Starr Hill:
Two great groups come together for two sets of dub and reggae, including a complete performance of the infamous "Dub Side of the Moon." $12/$10, 9pm.

Jim Waive (country-folk) at the Blue Moon Diner. Free, 8pm (W)

Karaoke Night with DJ Wild Wes at Buffalo Wild Wings. Free, 9pm (W)

Ben Reed of Calf Mountain Jam at Clock Tower Tavern in Staunton. No cover, 9pm.

Chicken Head Blues Band at Dürty Nelly's. $4, 9pm. (W)

Bluegrass Intentions featuring Bill Evans with Steve Smith at Gravity Lounge. $18/$15, 8pm.

Thompson/ D'earth and friends (freeform jazz) at Miller's. $4, 10pm. (W)

In Tenebris and No Gods, No Monsters at Outback Lodge. $3, 10pm.

Robert Jospé (jazz) at Rapture. No cover, 7:30pm. (W)

Satisfaction (dance party) at Rapture. No cover, 10:30pm. (W)

Middle Eastern Belly Dance Class at Rapunzel's Coffee & Books. Free, 6:30pm. (W)

Hogwaller Ramblers (bluegrass mayhem) at Shebeen. No cover, 10pm. (W)

Kait and Thom (modern jazz duo) at Tokyo Rose upstairs. No cover, 9:30pm. (W)

Upcoming and Ongoing
ART
A Hip Auction:
Albemarle Housing Improvement Program hosts an auction of work of local artists who will also be on hand selling paintings, sculptures, drawings, carvings, and photographs. Harp renderings by Eve Watters as well as hors d'oeuvres, soft drinks and cash bar are part of the evening to benefit then AHIP program which sponsors housing programs for low-income residents. 1111 E. Main St., next door to Mountain Air Gallery on the Downtown Mall. May 14, 5-9pm. 817-2447 or ahipva.org. Free admission.

Aboriginal Art Tours: Learn about the current exhibits at the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Museum on the free, weekly guided tour. Offered every Saturday morning at 10:30am. Call 244-0234 or visit virginia.edu/kluge-ruhe for info.

PERFORMANCE
Teen Acting Studio:
This weekly workshop focuses on opening up the text within a Shakespearean monologue through extensive language work: scanning the verse, exploring rhythm and sound, and working the breath. Students need to bring 3 sample Shakespearean monologues with them to the first class. Pre-requisite: Prior LATTE acting studio experience or instructor permission. Thursdays through June 3. 5-7pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. $60 members, $75 general. 977-4177.

Teen Acting Studio: Designed for the serious teen actor, this weekly workshop will focus on actor's vocal production and physical movement, skills that will then be put to practical use in work with monologues. Students should bring 3 sample contemporary monologues with them to the first class. Wednesdays until June 2. 5:30-7pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. $60 members, $75 general. 977-4177.

Live Arts Actor's LAB: Join acting coach and director Carol Pedersen to sharpen your acting tools and gear up for numerous summer acting possibilities now. New session runs Saturdays until June 19. Weekly drop-in session 10-11am, full session 10-1pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. $10 drop-in rate; $160 for full eight-week session. 977-4177x100.

WALKABOUT
Focusing on Help:
UVA Macular Degeneration Support Group meets the third Monday of each month. Education, resources, and networking with peers. Refreshments provided. 1:30-3pm Charlottesville Senior Center, Pepsi Place. No charge. 924-1941 jah3ef@virginia.edu.

Pets, Pets, Pets: The Paws to Adopt pet adoption center is open Saturdays. With pets from several area shelters, the center is committed to "brining the animals to the people." Noon-4pm. All Things Pawssible Dog Training Center. 706 Henry Ave. 973-4321.

Downtown Tours: The Albemarle-Charlottesville Historical Society offers walking tours of historic downtown Charlottesville every Saturday at 10am. Tours leave from the McIntire Building across from Lee Park and cover over 250 years of community history in one hour. $3 suggested donation. 296-1492.

Bocce and Brunch: Every Sunday through June, the Spruce Creek Gallery in Nellysford hosts the popular "Brunch and Bocce." Enjoy a catered brunch, and then try to figure out what this bocce thing is all about. Reservations required. 361-1859.

Visit Montpelier: Montpelier offers two outdoor walking tours each Saturday, one focusing on the plantation's slave community, and another on the more recent duPont estate. Afterwards, go behind the scenes and see rooms that are not regularly open to the public and areas of the house that are under renovation. Offered every half-hour from 10:30am-4pm. Visit montpelier.org for more info.

Monticello Gardens and Grounds: This guided tour explores the flower and vegetable gardens, grove, and orchards around Jefferson's home. Tours begin on the west lawn hourly at :15 after the hour starting at 9:15am. Fee included in price of general admission. 984-9822.

Ferry the James: The Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society is offering rides on the Hatton Ferry, one of the last poled ferries still in operation in the U.S., across the James River now through October 17. No fee. Open weekends from 9am-5pm. Located near Scottsville on Route 625. 296-1492.

Professional Tennis: Local tennis fans stand up and cheer, professional tennis is coming back to Charlottesville. Enjoy a week of world-class racquet play at the Boyd Tinsley USTA Women's Pro Tennis Championship. May 9-16 at the Boar's Head Inn's Sports Club. Free, and open to the public. Call 972-2237 or visit boarsheadinn.com for info.

FAMILY
Act up:
Old Michie Theatre offers Summer Theatre School where fun, learning, and self-expression are key. Beginning, intermediate, and advanced classes for different age groups and levels of ability starting June 14. 221 East Water St. 977-3690. oldmichie.com.

Roots and Wings: The Living Earth School brings kids closer to the earth with their summer residential youth camps. Three programs &emdash; Earth Roots (ages 8-11), Ancient Ways (advanced camp for ages 8-13), and Wilderness Quest (8-day backpacking trek for ages 12 and up) &emdash; are designed to help children get back to their roots and learn the philosophy of living close to the earth. These camps teach survival skills and much more. They are personal growth oriented, educational, and down right fun. Enrollment limited and fills fast, so register as soon as possible. Applications available on-line. 258 Rocky Bottom Lane, Afton. 540-456-7339. circleofseeds.com.

Railroad River Ramble: Call now for your tickets to join one of the James River Rambler railroad excursions happening on May 8, 22 and June 5. This popular train ride wanders through the rolling hills and deep forests of Buckingham County from Dillwyn along the historic Buckingham Branch rail line. Choose from a 90-minute or 3-hour tour. Sponsored by the Old Dominion Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society. Call between 10am-4pm on Saturdays, 1-4pm on Sundays: 800-451-6318. odcnrhs.org.

Eat or Be Eaten: Adventurous types can step into a dog-eat-dog world and find out "Who's for Dinner?" at a new exhibit at the Virginia Museum of Natural History. Taxidermied specimens, puppets, and interactive activities help explorers learn about the unusual ways animals hunt for their food and protect themselves from predators. Open Monday-Thursday 10am-4pm. Free. 104 Emmet St. 982-4605. virginia.edu/vmnh-uva.

Gentlemen, Start Your Engines!: The pressure. The teamwork. The danger. The speed. The fans. The groundbreaking IMAX® film NASCAR: The IMAX Experience thrusts you into the driver's seat to experience a visceral journey inside America's most popular spectator sport at the Science Museum of Virginia. Runs through September 17. Call or see website for schedule and cost. 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. 800-659-1727. smv.org.

Filling the Void: Stella is a black hole. Stella bats her lilac eyelashes and reminisces about her glory days as a giant star, how she explodes and becomes a black hole, and about the mysteries she still keeps to herself in the Science Museum of Virginia's multimedia planetarium show Black Holes now through June 13. Included in the price of admission. 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. 800-659-1727. smv.org.

Out of this World: The Science Museum of Virginia offers earthbound astronaut wannabes the chance to vicariously climb into a space capsule the size of a Volkswagen Beetle and blast off into the great unknown with the IMAX film Space Station showing now through June 11. Call or see website for schedule and cost. 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. 800-659-1727. smv.org.

World Beat: Discover how rhythm and movement link different cultures, locations, and musical traditions in the new IMAX film "Pulse: A Stomp Odyssey" at the Science Museum of Virginia. Two long-time Stomp performers guide visitors through grand landscapes and cultural celebrations in Brazil, South Africa, Spain, England, Japan, India, the United States, and various countries in Africa to learn how people from around the world experience music and dance. Runs through July 16. Call or see website for schedule and cost. 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. 800-659-1727. smv.org.

ART LIST
The Second Street Gallery presents two shows during May. The Main Gallery offers the film noir-inspired "Deceptions: Photographs by Lori Nix," and the Dové Gallery features "Bears in My Room: Works on Paper by Marcel Dzama." City Center for Contemporary Arts, corner of Second and E. Water streets. 977-7284.

The University of Virginia Art Museum presents "A Taste for Grace: Italian Prints from the 15th through 18th Centuries," continuing through August 15. In addition, the museum features Carrie Mae Weems' "The Jefferson Suite" through May 23. Also on view: "American Collage," including work by Andy Warhol, Adja Yunkers, and Robert Motherwell, among others, through August 24. 155 Rugby Road. 924-3952.

Glo displays the work of Christian Peri during the month of May. Corner of Third and E. Main on the Downtown Mall. 295-7432.

The Charlottesville-Albemarle Art Association's annual all-member exhibit is at the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport Mezzanine Gallery from May 3 until August 2. CAAA member paintings by Barbara Ryan and Randy Sights Baskerville are also on the second floor of the Albemarle County Office Building through August.

UVA Aunspaugh fellow Jennifer Bernard's "Sculptural Concerto" is on view at the Old Nature Gallery through May 23. 111 E. Water St. (behind the Jefferson Theatre). 882-6013.

The Village Playhouse displays the paintings and collages of Gordonsville artist Sarah Deacon during May. 313 Second St. SE. 296-9390.

The Kluge-Ruhe Collection of Aboriginal Art presents "Family Business: Kinship in Australian Aboriginal Art" through June 5. 400 Worrell Drive, Peter Jefferson Place. 244-0234.

"Dark Times," an exhibition of mixed-media work by Loes van Riel is on view at Angelo through June 30. 220 E. Main St. on the Downtown Mall. 971-9256.

At C'ville Coffee enjoy a children's art show presenting works by students of local watercolor artist Lee Alter. Through the end of May. 1301 Harris St. 979-4402.

Spencer's 206 shows work by Lisi Stoessel through the month of May. 295-2080.

The mezzanine at New Dominion Bookshop features the soft pastel paintings of Dick Carpenter through May 29. 404 E. Main St. on the Downtown Mall. 295-2552.

At the C&O Gallery, view "More than Landscapes," paintings by David Eaken, through May 31. Next door to the C&O Restaurant, 511 E. Water St. 971-7044.

Nature Visionary Art shows "Paci-Fist," mixed-media works by Jason Ruelle Andrews through May. 110 Fourth St. 296-8482.

From May 3-29, photographer Andrew Humphries' "Daylight" will be on view at Main Street Market. 416 W. Main St. 249-5448.

CODG presents "Nacer de Nuevo," photography by Melissa Wei, plus "Borrowed Faces," paintings by Eliza Martin. 112 E. Main St., under the Jefferson Theater. 242-4212.

New work by members of the Central Virginia Watercolor Guild, featuring watercolors, oils, pastels, and mixed media is on display at the Albemarle County Courthouse through July 31. McIntire Road. 296-8484.

The Dave Moore Studio features an "Open Door and Spring-type Show" during May. Hours vary, so call first. 414 E. Main St. (under The Twisted Branch Tea Bazaar). 825-1870.

Priscilla Whitlock's paintings of North Carolina beach scenes are on view at the architectural firm of Stoneking/Von Storch through May 14. Fifth and Water streets. 295-4204.

Les Yeux du Monde@dot2Dot offers two shows during May: paintings and sculpture by Italo Scanga and artwork by Donna Mintz (who painted the image on the cover of Mary Chapin Carpenter's CD Between Here and Gone). 115 S. First St. 973-5566.

Thomas Jefferson Memorial Church features an exhibition of paintings by local architect Kurt Wassenaar and his mother, Dottie Wassenaar, through June 6. 717 Rugby Road. 293-8179.

Michael Fitts shows his paintings at the Mudhouse during May. 213 W. Main St. on the Downtown Mall. 984-6833.

L'étoile Restaurant displays paintings by local artists Barry Gordon and Malcolm Hughes. Gordon's abstract works feature interiors and everyday objects; Hughes portrays landscapes in the Impressionist style. 817 W. Main St. (across from the Amtrak Station). 979-7957.

Take a stroll through the 57 acres of Virginia's first-ever Sculpture Park, located on the grounds of Baker-Butler Elementary School. 2740 Proffit Road. 974-7777x1402.

Paintings by Gloria Mitchell are on display at The Artful Lodger, 1807 Seminole Trail. 970-1900.

During May, view "Another Stroke of Nature," Chinese brush paintings by Rosy Kin-On King, at Art Upstairs. 316 E. Main St., above The Hardware Store, on the Downtown Mall. 923-3900.

"Art and the Natural World," an exhibit featuring science themes, is on display at the Science and Engineering Library's new reading room. The exhibit is a highlight of the library's grand opening in Clark Hall, and will be up through the academic year. The exhibit features work by UVA art faculty. 924-3628.

Jerry O'Dell's paintings and stained glass creations are on view at Blue Ridge Glass & Crafts. 1724 Allied St. 293-2876.

During May, The McGuffey Art Center presents "New Works," paintings by Jean R. Sampson, plus a display of mixed-media art dolls by Susan Leschke. Also on view: "Euphony," paintings by Joan Cabell, and "For Loves' Sake," Lee Alter's watercolor exhibition. Upstairs don't miss the art by local high school students. 201 Second St. NW. 295-7973. See Art feature.

Transient Crafters displays "The Genesis of a Teapot," a series of fey and elegant teapots created by potter Jan Crowther, through the end of May. 118 W. Main St. on the Downtown Mall. 972-9500.

The Bozart Gallery presents "Paths, Portals, and Passages," oil paintings by Ron Swinnerton that "explore the intrigue of what is beyond the horizon and around the corner," through May 30. 211 W. Main St. 296-4669.

Martha Jefferson Hospital presents a show entitled "The Creative Process" through June 4. 459 Locust Ave. 982-7000.

Radar

The Arts Center in Orange presents oil paintings by Lou Schellenberg through May 15. 129 E. Main St., 540-672-7311, artcenter@nexet.com.

Sun's Traces Gallery displays baskets by Charlotte LaRoy (featured in The Fiber Arts Design Book), as well as clay works by Paula Brown-Steedly, handmade paper by Rebecca Humphrey, and weaving by Barbara Gentry and Pat Hoover. Barboursville. 540-832-7044.

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts presents "Bonjour, Monsieur Corbet! The Bruyas Collection from the Musee Fabre, Montpelier," and "Van Gogh and Gauguin: An Artistic Dialogue in the South of France," through June 13. Also on view: "Best Friends: Portraits of Sydney and Francis Lewis," a series of portraits by a range of artists, including Chuck Close and Andy Warhol, through July 11. 2800 Grove Ave. 804-924-2704.

The Ed Jaffe Gallery features paintings and marble sculptures by Ed Jaffe, plus abstract photographs by Marc Jaffe. 108 W. Main St., Orange. 540-672-2400. www.edjaffe.com.

Charlottesville artist Elizabeth Geiger displays her paintings at the Williams School of Commerce at Washington and Lee University. Lexington. 540-458-8602.

Sunspots Studios in Staunton offer live glassblowing demonstrations every day by master glassblower Phillip Nolley and art glass artist Minh Martin, both in residence. Corner of Lewis and Middlebrook streets in downtown Staunton, across from the train station. 540-885-0678.

The Artisans Center of Virginia presents "Familiars," an exhibition of woodwork by Alan Kaplan, during the month of May. 601 Shenandoah Village Drive (exit 94 off I-64), Waynesboro. 540-946-3294. ACV@nexet.net

During May, Caffé Bocce displays "Roy-Rossi Reflections II" paintings by Coy Roy and the late Al Rossi. Opening reception, May 8, 3-5pm. 330 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-4422.

Other

The Arts Center In Orange is seeking exhibits for their growing Satellite Gallery program that currently includes Not the Same Old Grind, a coffee shop on Church St., and The Virginia National Bank on Main St. Please send no more than five slides (two-dimensional work only) and an artist bio to The Arts Center In Orange Satellite Gallery Program; 129 E. Main St., Box 13, Orange 22960. 540-672-7311, artcenter@nexet.com.

FEATURES/FEATURES/FEATURES
ART
Young at art: Schooling their elders
By Laura Parsons art@readthehook.com

Psst, here's tip: Some of the most exciting art to go up this year is currently on the second floor of the McGuffey Art Center. But it's not an exhibition by any of the usual suspects; it's a sprawling show of work created by local high school students

Before you shake your head, sure that I've ratcheted down my standards to accommodate teenagers' limited range, let me emphasize there was no need for any of that. The standout pieces in this show– and there are more than there's space to discuss– stun with their technical skill and fresh vision.

Among the ceramic pieces, Monticello High School senior Carmen Hoskins' "Five Vessels" dazzle with the artist's skill at the wheel (has she been throwing pots since she was 4?) and mastery of glazing. A small cup's chalk-white exterior features a few harmonious dribbles extending from its olive-green cavity, shining with hints of gunmetal blue.

Going in a completely different direction, St. Anne's-Belfield student Bennett Toms' egg-to-teal-beastie series of four raku sculptures almost breathes through Toms' execution of a strange fantasy.

Two other St. Anne's-Belfield students' pieces display accomplished realism. Ji-Hyoe Kim's pencil drawing, "The Bicycle in the Shower Bath," holds the eye with its almost photo-realistic detail. Maggie Smith's oil-on-canvas "Dinner Time" elevates a mundane moment (her mother at work over a skillet) via palette, composition, and observation (the under-the-counter kitchen implements and buttons on a nearby coffee-maker are specific and evocative).

Among the Charlottesville High School contributions, several collages stand out. Ninth-grader Megan Roach's untitled work uses simple shapes and strong colors to create a stark, moonlit landscape with a strange man-tree at its center. And Evan Dickinson's darkly atmospheric appears to move through its beautiful and eerie layers.

Perhaps the most complex piece in the show– at least in terms of technique– is Anna Ryan's large composition, "New York Taxi." Ryan combines acrylic paint with pasted pages of poetry and scraps of a New York City street map, all affixed to a metal sheet, to yield an image of a lonely cabbie sitting behind his wheel at sunset.

Finally, a personal favorite is Tandem Friends 12th-grader Isabella Scott's bizarre multi-media wall sculpture, "Howard's Nightmare." A rectangular honeycomb, partially obscured by brown paper, writhes with winged stinging things, some fully formed, others hatching from resinous goo. Through the right side, a blue jay's head pokes, as strands of mucous-y honey drip from the composition. I've never seen anything like it.

Hats off to the teachers and parents who encourage these artists.

The exhibition of artwork by area high school students will be on view at McGuffey Art Center through the end of May. 201 Second St. NW. 295-7973.

WORDS
Court order: Brown was just the beginning
BY ELIZABETH KIEM WORDS@READTHEHOOK.COM

The commemoration of the Supreme Court's historic decision to outlaw school segregation a half century ago has been a timely event all year long. What Lewis & Clark was to '03, Brown v. Board is to '04.

But you haven't really gotten your fill of the landmark case until you've read UVA law professor Michael Klarman's definitive legal treatment, From Jim Crow to Civil Rights. Weighing in at 650 pages with notes and appendices, Klarman's book examines the precedents for desegregation leading up to Brown, the makeup and character of the Warren Court, the changes in the social fabric, and how those changes affected legal decision making.

Klarman's scholarship is uncontroversial, but his conclusion is original. Brown v. Board, in his analysis, was a toothless legal victory– a ruling not so much adhered to as galvanized against. In that galvanization is the source of the real victory for the Civil Rights movement. Only "massive resistance" produced massive integration.

When Brown was handed down in 1954, a half-dozen northern and western states were already desegregating schools, in response to the social and political forces unleashed by WWII. Racial practices were changing in most border states, even if schools remained segregated. Brown's impact in those states, asserts Klarman was measurable only because "most whites… were not intensely resistant."

Not so in the former Confederacy, which in 1957 still had failed to integrate a single school. In five Deep South states, 1.4 million black schoolchildren were barred from white schools even in late 1960. "This is probably not exactly what the justices had in mind by 'all deliberate speed,' " notes Klarman dryly.

Evasion of Brown took many forms from "freedom of choice" plans and transfer options to pupil placement programs that inevitably upheld the status quo. District courts, composed as they were of local judges, did not, for a decade, feel obligated by the Supreme Court's language to crack down on evasion tactics.

In fact, Klarman suggests, the stalling would have been more effective if segregationists had simply stopped there. What, after all, was Jim Crow if not a model in popular legal evasion? But in pursuing a course of violence and extremist behavior, segregationists gave blacks their heaviest ammunition&endash; the sympathy of the rest of the less defiant nation and the troops of President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

On the road from Jim Crow to Civil Rights, Brown was a milestone much like the Rockies were to Lewis & Clark: a great divide, and a sign of a larger struggle to come.

Michael Klarman is at Barnes & Noble, Saturday, March 15, at 2pm. 984-0461. His book is From Jim Crow to Civil Rights, The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality.

FAMILY
Comes naturally: Looking at birth alternatives
BY LINDA KOBERT FAMILY@READTHEHOOK.COM

When I was pregnant, it seemed as if everybody had some sort of advice for me, most of which seemed intended to scare the bejesus out of me. It was like pregnancy and childbirth were a terrible disease. All I needed to do, however, was turn myself over to the care of the highly trained medical professionals who knew so much more than I did; they would see to it that I got through the ordeal with the least amount of trauma. But there would definitely be trauma.

In the haze of hormones and sleeplessness that accompanies childbirth, I remember thinking that for as long as women have been having babies, you'd think there would be a better way.

"I was lucky," Julia Weissman says of her birth experiences. "I found out about midwifery with my first child."

Weissman is the mother of two children born at home with the help of a licensed midwife. She is also a spokesperson for Informed Birth Options, a local childbirth advocacy group.

This month her group has joined forces with a state-wide coalition of midwifery organizations to spread the word that indeed there are alternatives to the medicalization of childbirth. Through a series of video presentations and discussions, the group introduces the full range of birth options and offers information that can empower couples to ask knowledgeable questions and make informed decisions.

The series starts Thursday, May 13, with Special Delivery, a film that's become a classic in childbirth education circles. Three couples speak about their birth experiences and what worked and didn't work for them. The film addresses birthing centers, hospital births, midwife-attended and home birth, labor positions, breathing and relaxation, and the father's role in it all.

The presentation on Thursday, May 20, Born in the U.S.A.: A Documentary about Childbirth in America, considers what "normal" means as it applies to birth. From the perspective of a range of medical and midwifery professionals, it explores the landscape of modern maternity care in this country and takes a searching look at the appropriate use of technology in childbirth.

The final film of the series, Choices and Challenges, discusses the safety of homebirth and the power of women to achieve a truly natural birth, and alludes to the transformative process that childbirth can become.

It seems that, indeed, there is another way.

The childbirth video series and discussion is open to expectant parents, doulas, childbirth educators, physicians, nurses, grandparents, and others who are interested. Sessions take place on three consecutive Thursdays beginning May 13 at Central Library, 6:30-8:30pm. Free. 201 E. Market St. 978-4779.

WALKABOUT
Throwback: Small town, big celebration
BY TIM SPRINKLE WALKABOUT@READTHE
HOOK.COM

There's something special about a small town festival. The kind of down-home gathering where you can sit back and enjoy some live music, get your face painted, eat a slice of apple pie, and maybe even take in a brisk afternoon moon bounce.

If you think this sounds like the kind of event that's been erased by the suburbanization of our Wal-mart world, think again. It's just the sort of spring festival that tiny Batesville has been hosting for the past 27 years.

"Batesville is a unique community that comes together for events like this," says Marjorie Siegel with the Batesville Ruritan Club. "And since Page's Store reopened, it's like we have the heart of the village back, so people are really excited to come out this year. It's country living at its best– it's really sweet– and it's fun for the whole family."

This year's Batesville Day Festival is shaping up to be just that. The day kicks off early with the legendary 10k race at 8am. The longest continually held road race in the state, the Batesville 10k is well known in running circles for its challenging, hilly course and breathtaking scenery.

"People who run know this race," Siegel says. This year, organizers have also added a 5k "Hunger Walk" so even non-runners can enjoy a brisk morning workout on the Batesville course.

And who could forget the parade? Described as "a family event that promotes individuality, freedom of expression, and glee," the Batesville Day Parade always offers surprises, but its three blocks of marching bands, "broom patrols," and delightfully eclectic demonstrations are not to be missed.

"We've had some unusual floats in the parade," Siegel admits, "but it's a lot of fun, very low key." All proceeds go to the Batesville Ruritan Club and stay in the community&endash; supporting local schools, rescue squads, organizations, fire departments, and the less fortunate.

With thousands of UVA graduates and their families clogging Charlottesville on Saturday, do you really need a reason to head out of town for the day?

Batesville Day is Saturday, May 15, at the Batesville Day Field on Plank Road (Rt. 692). From Charlottesville, take 29 South for about 10 miles and turn right onto Plank Road. Drive another five miles and look for the tents, crowds, and parking on the right. Race registration begins at 7am at Page's Field ($12 before May 15, $15 on race day). All runners/walkers receive a free t-shirt. Call Hamp Carruth at 823-5927 for 10k info, John Pollack at 823-7330 for the 5k Hunger Walk. The parade begins at 11am. Anyone interested in participating should contact April Freeman at 823-7978.

PERFORMANCE
Zeitgeist? Town swarms with dancers
BY STEPHEN BOYKEWICH PERFORMANCE@READTHEHOOK.COM

You can't blame Americans for not knowing their history. Who wants to dwell on our grim, benighted past, that terrible time before towns of 35,000 had classes in baby yoga, hot yoga, and yoga for dogs? Thankfully it's just a distant memory now. There's no shortage of spots where Charlottesvillians can contort their way to enlightenment while meeting other well-toned locals for fun, companionship, and the foundation of new modern dance companies.

Something's got to explain where all the dance companies are coming from.

"It's a zeitgeist thing," says Ashley Thorndike, co-founder and co-artistic director of Prospect Dance Company, which opens its new show, A Sort of Explanation, this weekend, May 15-16. Thorndike credits companies like SEED Dance Exchange and Zen Monkey Project, as well as the many independent choreographers in town, for creating an environment where dancers can thrive on each other's inspiration.

"It feels great as an artist to live in a small town and have a garden and at the same time be artistically challenged," she says.

And have someplace for your dog to perfect the lotus position.

Prospect Dance Company was born out of two auspicious meetings. The first was between Thorndike and composer/videographer Peter Swendsen at the 2002 Fringe Festival, where both were presenting work. The two clicked and began to talk about a collaboration.

The second was between Thorndike and dancer/choreographer Dinah Gray, which took place at– can you guess?– a yoga class. Gray added to the mix by also being a poet: She holds an MFA from Columbia University.

Since then, the three have split their time between fundraising, season planning, and building a repertory. The company performed its first evening-length work to full houses in January of 2004, and in the same month moved into the former Second Street Gallery space in the McGuffey Art Center. Like many McGuffey artists, they offer weekly classes and open their studio to the public.

A Sort of Explanation displays the full range of its creators' talents, combining movement, text, music, and video– both pre-recorded and live-feed. The show centers on three poems Gray wrote in graduate school, and features solos by five performers (including a seven-months-pregnant Gray) as well as group dances.

Thorndike recalls a conversation she had about multi-media dance theater with the legendary Bill T. Jones last spring. "He had some reservations about using film," she says, "which is strange because he uses it so well. But that's part of what makes an artist successful, I think: being self-critical."

True enough. But don't forget the yoga.

A Sort of Explanation runs Thursday through Saturday, May 13-22, at 8pm. Performances at the McGuffey Art Center, 201 Second St. NW. Receptions follow both Saturday shows. Tickets $12. 409-6056.

TUNES
All the above?: A band of many sources
BY MARK GRBOWSKI TUNES@READTHEHOOK.COM

Wearing your influences on your sleeve is a bit risky for any band, if the groups you look at for musical inspiration are at a level above the big 3– the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and Elvis. Everyone is influenced by the aforementioned founding fathers of the rock dynasty– it's when groups closely follow the sound of later, more specialized groups that trouble arises.

Aping Radiohead, with a sound like no one else's, is a bit daft (but that hasn't stopped Travis or Coldplay from following The Bends-era group to its overblown conclusion). The Chapel Hill band Go Machine sound, depending on the song, like Coldplay, Postal Service, and a pickup truck of bluegrass musicians suffering a high-speed collision with a sample-crazy DJ.

Sometime in 2002 songwriters Daniel Hart (vocals, guitar, violin, bass, drums) and David Daniels (vocals, drums, keyboards, guitar, bass), programmer Alex Lazara (keyboards, programming, theremin, vocals) and percussionist Jeremy Portwood formed Go Machine via long distance phone calls and the Internet.

Setting up musical shop in North Carolina, the group began to record what would become their first album, look to the (Bu Hanan Records), released in 2003. That year would also see the exit of Portwood, but the group persevered as a three-piece, relying increasingly on laptop trickery to supply the group's rhythm.

look to the is described as a mini album on the group's website (gomachine.com– though we in the music biz would probably label the album an EP); composed of six songs and running a little more than 35 minutes, it reveals an apparently schizophrenic band who have not yet defined themselves apart from their forefathers.

Track 1, "Great Northwest"– all acoustic guitars and violin, and for the first three minutes or so, only random vocal samples– set the group's sound apart from any good bluegrass outfit. At the three-minute mark, suddenly the beat becomes disco, and synth bass warbles in the song's background. It's a neat fake-out trick, and the group pulls the switch well.

As for Track 2, "Many Times"– either Coldplay or Go Machine have something to explain here. "The Scientist" from the former band's second album, Rush of Blood to the Head, is as good a touchstone as any.

Track 3, "Doppelganger"– though the song seems to be about a personal twin, the title could also refer to the electronic beat-heavy (combined with acoustic guitar) sound of this track vis-à-vis the sound of the Sub Pop group the Postal Service. Considering they released their first album in 2003, it's not like the latter group is unknown here– the Postal Service is a bit of a super-group, composed of members of Dntel and Death Cab for Cutie.

Track 6, "What Can You Do (but keep movin' on)" is one place where Go Machine's originality comes shining through– slow building to a group singalong to "What can you do but keep movin' on?" the tune is a beautiful rendering of staccato violin and plucked electric, and even live drums.

Two interesting songs out of six does not an EP save, and I'm waiting to hear Go Machine transcend their influences– give me a ring when you do.

Go Machine and the Teeth at Twisted Branch Tea Bazaar, May 14. No cover, 9pm.