HookCast for March 22, 2007

Is America ready for Trevor Moore?, Short story contest winner, Turn in your kid?

ON THIS WEEK’S COVER:

Is America ready for Moore? Trevor sure hopes so
A decade ago, Trevor Moore was a wisecracking teenager with a popular sketch comedy show on Charlottesville public access that towed the line between good and bad taste. Now he's grown up and on national TV every week as part of The Whitest Kids U' Know, a half-hour sketch comedy show put on by the troupe of the same name that he co-founded. Can the former cable access sensation make America laugh?

Additionally, we have a winner in our annual short story contest and this year, this year the prize goes to Charles McRaven of Free Union for his story First Stones. Of it, our judge John Grisham says, "The plot alone could carry a short novel. The characters are rich enough for a long series of strange adventures." We congratulate Mr. McRaven and you can read his story in its entirety in this week's Hook.

ALSO IN THIS WEEK'S ISSUE

New rule: Parent, rat out thy school child
In the wake of the tragic death last spring of an Albemarle High student in an alcohol-related traffic accident, county schools toughened rules for athletes and now require parents to sign a pledge that they will turn in their child if she's caught drinking, using illegal drugs or tobacco. Are schools intruding on parents' authority?

and

'UVA proof': New law fixes FOIA loophole
Will Shaw went to the Supreme Court of Virginia to get UVA to comply with a Freedom of Information Act request. His suit was rejected– not because the material he asked for was exempt from FOIA, but because, he says, UVA claimed in court that it was not a state agency. Now a new law intends to change all that.

Plus:
* Appalachian novelist Lee Smith takes a spin in the HotSeat
* William Beebe gets sentenced 23 years later
* The sale of a Palmyra bistro gets sticky
* Woolen Mills residents get fired up over zoning

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1 comment

Wow, this HookCast speaker sounds so professional with a voice that seems, so crisp and clean-- like a clean-shaven face. What a class act!